Eva Kiesler, PhD

Senior Science Writer/Editor

Recent Blog Posts

Exceptional responders of new drugs in clinical trials.
Decoder
Tuesday, March 24, 2015

When a clinical trial of a new drug fails because most patients don’t respond, progress can still be made by analyzing the tumors of the rare patients who benefit.

Fibrous extensions of a nerve cell (red) and an oligodendrocyte (green) growing on top of the nerve cell
In the Lab
Thursday, February 5, 2015

In a recent study, Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists used stem-cell engineering to repair brain injuries in rats. The results raise hope for future therapies that could prevent or fix nerve damage in cancer patients who need brain radiation.

Pictured: Michael Zelefsky
In the Clinic
Monday, February 2, 2015

Researchers call for intensified efforts to help men with prostate cancer quit smoking after a recent MSK study revealed that patients who smoke during radiation therapy face a higher risk of both having the disease return and dying from it.

Epigenetics
Q&A
Friday, January 30, 2015

An experimental drug for acute myelogenous leukemia might potentially help many more patients than previously thought by controlling epigenetic processes, according to a recent MSK study.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok, Alexandra Snyder Charen and Timothy Chan
In the Lab
Thursday, November 20, 2014

In people with melanoma who respond to the drug ipilimumab, certain mutations make tumors more visible to the immune system.

Cancer biologist Andrea Ventura
In the Lab
Thursday, November 6, 2014

For the first time, Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists have created a mouse model that replicates a subtype of non-small cell lung cancer caused by a chromosomal rearrangement — a type of mutation that is common in cancers but thus far has been very difficult to study.

Pictured: Scott Lowe
In the Lab
Tuesday, September 30, 2014

In taking a new approach to finding treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, MSK scientists have uncovered a potential drug target for this highly aggressive cancer.

Lab mouse with cultured human pluripotent stem cells
In the Lab
Thursday, August 7, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed a powerful new way to study human disease using stem cells whose genomes can be manipulated at will.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi
In the Lab
Wednesday, August 6, 2014

A newly discovered gene mutation appears to be the driving force behind a particularly aggressive form of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer of the skeletal muscle.

Pictured: Robotic surgery
In the Clinic
Thursday, July 24, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that the use of surgical robots does not lead to better outcomes in patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer, bringing into question the added costs of the tools.

Pictured: Gum ball machines
Decoder
Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Serge Lyashchenko
In the Clinic
Friday, June 27, 2014

The launch of a 20-ton instrument and a facility for producing radioactive imaging molecules will allow our doctors and scientists to monitor cancers in unparalleled detail.

Pictured: Michael Berger
In the Clinic
Thursday, June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Pictured: José Baselga, Agnès Viale,  Michael Berger & David Solit
Announcement
Tuesday, May 20, 2014

With the creation of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering sets out to deliver on the promise of personalized medicine by creating better treatment options for all people with cancer.

Pictured: Jason Lewis, Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis & Daniel Heller
Announcement
Monday, May 12, 2014

The new center brings together scientists and clinicians working in various fields who will use the power of imaging to speed research and innovations in cancer care.