Eva Kiesler, PhD

Senior Science Writer/Editor

Recent Blog Posts

Lab mouse with cultured human pluripotent stem cells
In the Lab
Thursday, August 7, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed a powerful new way to study human disease using stem cells whose genomes can be manipulated at will.

Pictured: Robotic surgery
In the Clinic
Thursday, July 24, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that the use of surgical robots does not lead to better outcomes in patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer, bringing into question the added costs of the tools.

Pictured: Gum ball machines
Decoder
Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Serge Lyashchenko
In the Clinic
Friday, June 27, 2014

The launch of a 20-ton instrument and a facility for producing radioactive imaging molecules will allow our doctors and scientists to monitor cancers in unparalleled detail.

Pictured: Michael Berger
In the Clinic
Thursday, June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Pictured: José Baselga, Agnès Viale,  Michael Berger & David Solit
Announcement
Tuesday, May 20, 2014

With the creation of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering sets out to deliver on the promise of personalized medicine by creating better treatment options for all people with cancer.

Pictured: Jason Lewis, Anna-Katerina Hadjantonakis & Daniel Heller
Announcement
Monday, May 12, 2014

The new center brings together scientists and clinicians working in various fields who will use the power of imaging to speed research and innovations in cancer care.

Pictured: Macrophage & Tumor Cells
Feature
Thursday, May 1, 2014

Approaches used for research into the social lives of bacteria can also be used to explore how tumors behave and evolve.

Pictured: Human cell nucleus
Snapshot
Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The discovery of a molecular process that slows down cell division could provide new understanding about how some cancers develop.

Pictured: Daniel Heller
Video
Thursday, March 27, 2014

The research team of chemist and engineer Daniel Heller creates new nanoscale materials that are specially designed to improve biological research or solve clinical problems.

 Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel
In the Lab
Thursday, February 27, 2014

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Mouse glioblastoma tumor with phagocytic macrophages
In the Lab
Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers say a drug that acts on noncancerous, tumor-infiltrating cells might provide a new treatment option for the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer.

Breast cancer mosaic
Snapshot
Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists are developing new imaging instrumentation that could enable pathologist and surgeons to collaborate more seamlessly and reduce the need for repeat surgeries.

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Snapshot
Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered how a common bacterium can evolve to become more mobile and easier to get rid of.