Eva Kiesler, PhD

Senior Science Writer/Editor

Recent Blog Posts

Pictured: Michael Berger & David Solit
Feature
Monday, November 26, 2012

At Memorial Sloan Kettering, new technologies to study gene changes in cancer cells are accelerating the development and implementation of more-effective treatments.

Pictured: Scott Lowe
Q&A
Monday, November 19, 2012

In the lab of cancer biologist Scott Lowe, researchers are investigating the processes that naturally inhibit cancer development.

Pictured: PET Scan
In the Lab
Thursday, November 15, 2012

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering are developing a new strategy for PET imaging of tumors that could result in new tools to detect and monitor prostate cancer.

In the Lab
Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Helena Furberg
Finding
Wednesday, June 27, 2012

In the largest study of genes and smoking performed in a minority population to date, researchers have discovered a gene variant that increases a person’s risk of smoking.

Pictured: Douglas Levine and Petar Jelinic
In the Lab
Thursday, June 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators hope their new web tool will improve the accessibility of large-scale genome-sequencing information for cancer researchers everywhere, and accelerate research and therapeutic discovery.

Pictured: Rhonda D’Agostino
Feature
Monday, June 18, 2012

Rhonda D’Agostino cares for people with life-threatening complications due to cancer or its treatment – and helped pioneer a new ICU model that trains nurse practitioners and physician assistants to deliver the highest standard of care.

Pictured: At Eternity’s Gate by Vincent van Gogh
In the Clinic
Monday, April 30, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that people in the late stages of cancer might benefit from meaning-centered psychotherapy, a treatment aimed at helping people sustain a sense of meaning and purpose.

Pictured: Michael Kharas
Profile
Wednesday, April 11, 2012

As a child, Michael Kharas knew that he wanted to “be making the drugs doctors use to cure people.” Today he investigates molecular processes that stem cells and tumor cells have in common – in the hopes of uncovering insights for treatments for cancer and other diseases.

Pictured: T cells on surface on thymus
In the Lab
Friday, April 6, 2012

A recent study holds promise for the development of a new type of drug to alleviate immune deficiency caused by cancer treatment, radiation injury, or certain diseases.

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung
In the Lab
Tuesday, March 13, 2012

In a large-scale genome-sequencing study, researchers have discovered mutations in neuroblastoma tumors that could aid the development of diagnostic tests and therapies.

Pictured: Ion Channel K2P1
Q&A
Thursday, February 9, 2012

Structural biologist Stephen Long talks about how his team used x-ray crystallography to discover the structure of an ion channel called K2P1.

Pictured: Monica Morrow
Perspective
Tuesday, January 31, 2012

Breast Surgical Service Chief Monica Morrow provides perspective on assessing the quality of surgical breast cancer treatment in an editorial in the February 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Pictured: Nancy Lee
In the Clinic
Monday, December 19, 2011

People with cancer of the nasopharynx, an area behind the nose, may benefit from a new combination therapy, according to an international study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering radiation oncologist Nancy Y. Lee.