Eva Kiesler, PhD

Senior Science Writer/Editor

Recent Blog Posts

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Snapshot
Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered how a common bacterium can evolve to become more mobile and easier to get rid of.

Pictured: Cancer cell lines
In the Lab
Monday, August 26, 2013

A recent study found that the cell lines most commonly used for research on ovarian cancer are not the most suitable.

Pictured: Scott Lowe & Zhen Zhao
Video
Friday, July 19, 2013

Watch our scientists discuss how the Geoffrey Beene Center helped Memorial Sloan Kettering establish a progressive approach to modern cancer research.

Pictured: Three-dimensional structure of the protein mTOR
In the Lab
Thursday, May 30, 2013

In an eagerly awaited study, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers report on the molecular structure of mTOR, a protein commonly mutated in cancer.

Charles Sawyers, Kenneth Offit, and Larry Norton
Honor
Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Charles Sawyers, Larry Norton, and Kenneth Offit are being honored with special awards at the annual meeting of the world’s leading professional organization for cancer physicians and researchers.

Pictured: Melanocytes
Snapshot
Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed innovative ways to study some skin diseases, including melanoma skin cancer.

Pictured: Joseph Deasy
Profile
Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Dr. Deasy, Chair of the Department of Medical Physics and an expert in radiation therapy, talks about using physics to contribute to the fight against cancer.

Pictured: X-ray Image
In the Lab
Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Scientists have identified genes and biological mechanisms that one day could be targeted with drugs to stop kidney cancer from spreading to the bone, brain, or other organs.

Pictured: Ming Li
Q&A
Friday, December 14, 2012

Recent findings by Memorial Sloan Kettering immunologists might one day pave the way for new strategies to control a range of diseases, including autoimmune disorders and cancer.

Pictured: Lorenz Studer
Q&A
Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Methods to generate stem cells have given scientists new ways to study some diseases and identify potential drugs, and could one day be used to rebuild diseased or damaged tissues in patients.

Pictured: Michael Berger & David Solit
Feature
Monday, November 26, 2012

At Memorial Sloan Kettering, new technologies to study gene changes in cancer cells are accelerating the development and implementation of more-effective treatments.

Pictured: Scott Lowe
Q&A
Monday, November 19, 2012

In the lab of cancer biologist Scott Lowe, researchers are investigating the processes that naturally inhibit cancer development.

Pictured: PET Scan
In the Lab
Thursday, November 15, 2012

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering are developing a new strategy for PET imaging of tumors that could result in new tools to detect and monitor prostate cancer.

In the Lab
Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.