Jim Stallard, MA

Senior Writer/Editor

Recent Blog Posts

Feature
Friday, September 21, 2012

With the genomics revolution, scientists and physicians have increasingly been able to peer at the inner workings of tumor cells and pinpoint the specific genetic changes that transform them from their cells of origin into cancer.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
Thursday, September 6, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found why certain drugs are not sufficiently effective in treating leukemias called myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit & Zsofia Stadler
In the Lab
Friday, August 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators have found that some testicular cancers arising early in life may result from genetic changes that have not been inherited from either parent.

Pictured: Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum
In the O.R.
Monday, July 9, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering surgeons have pioneered a technique that may improve quality of life for women with early-stage gynecologic cancers.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
Thursday, March 15, 2012

Researchers have identified a set of genetic abnormalities that can enhance prognostic accuracy and aid treatment selection for people with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Pictured: David Panicek & Barbara Raphael
Feature
Thursday, March 1, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering trains medical students, residents, and fellows to become leaders in cancer diagnosis and treatment.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi & Laetitia Borsu
In the Lab
Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have performed the first large-scale genetic analysis of several pediatric cancers, identifying mutations and potential targets for therapies to treat the cancers.

Pictured: Hans-Guido Wendel
Profile
Tuesday, December 20, 2011

German-born cancer biologist Hans-Guido Wendel is taking advantage of transformative advances in genomics technology to understand key genetic abnormalities in leukemia and lymphoma.

Pictured: Monica Morrow
In the Clinic
Monday, November 21, 2011

Research published in the November 19 issue of The Lancet finds that MRI use for breast cancer screening in women at high risk for the disease – due to family history or a genetic mutation – detects more cancers than screening mammography.