Julie Grisham, MS

Freelance Science Writer

Recent Blog Posts

Q&A
Monday, July 21, 2014

In this Q&A and video, medical oncologist Mark Dickson discusses his approach to treating sarcoma and melanoma and how he develops individual treatment plans for each patient.

Pictured: William Tap
Q&A
Monday, July 14, 2014

In this Q&A, medical oncologist William Tap describes Memorial Sloan Kettering’s expertise in providing cutting-edge treatment for people with different types of soft tissue sarcoma.

Pictured: Helen McArthur
In the Clinic
Tuesday, June 3, 2014

The treatment combines a technique called cryoablation, or freezing of the tumor, with an immunotherapy drug.

Pictured: David Solit
Profile
Tuesday, May 27, 2014

David Solit, Director of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, discusses how working with cancer patients drives him to develop more-effective, personalized cancer treatments.

Pictured: 2014 Graduates
Event
Friday, May 23, 2014

Degrees were presented and awards were given at the 35th annual ceremony held on May 14.

Pictured: Mark Kris
Finding
Wednesday, May 21, 2014

A new study has found that driver mutations can be found in about two-thirds of lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting options for treatment with targeted therapies.

Pictured: Liver Cells
Decoder
Friday, May 16, 2014

Cell biologist Michael Overholtzer explains apoptosis, a form of programmed cell death that can lead to cancer when it doesn’t function properly.

Pictured: Mary Jane Massie & Tari King
In the Clinic
Monday, April 7, 2014

Increasingly, women diagnosed with cancer in one breast are choosing to have their other, healthy breast removed, but experts say this additional surgery provides no survival benefits.

Pictured: Noah Kauff
In the News
Friday, March 28, 2014

A study has found that mutations in the gene BRCA1 are associated with an increased likelihood of developing a rare, aggressive form of uterine cancer.

Pictured: Richard Steingart
In the Clinic
Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Cancer treatments, both traditional treatments and newer targeted therapies, can lead to short-term and long-term heart problems.

Decoder
Thursday, March 13, 2014

Cancer biologist Robert Benezra explains angiogenesis, the process by which new blood vessels form, and how it relates to cancer research.

Event
Friday, March 7, 2014

Cycle for Survival, Memorial Sloan Kettering’s indoor team cycling fund-raiser, raises money exclusively for research on rare cancers.

Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq
In the Lab
Monday, March 3, 2014

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

Pictured: Renier Brentjens, Isabelle Rivière & Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
Thursday, February 20, 2014

A new study evaluating a cell-based immune therapy to treat an aggressive type of leukemia — the largest study of its kind to date — reports that 88 percent of patients responded to the treatment.

Pictured: Diane Reidy
Feature
Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Cycle for Survival, Memorial Sloan Kettering’s nationwide indoor team cycling event, helps support research into rare cancers. Three researchers discuss how these funds benefit their research.