Pictured: Marc Ladanyi
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, August 6, 2014

A newly discovered gene mutation appears to be the driving force behind a particularly aggressive form of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer of the skeletal muscle.

Q&A
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, August 4, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigator Ann Zauber answers questions about the risks and benefits of colon cancer screening in the elderly.

Pictured: Richard O’Reilly
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, July 31, 2014

A study shows that treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with stem cell transplantation is very effective, especially if done early.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 28, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found a naturally occurring compound that can destroy cancer cells in mice by targeting MYC, a cancer-causing gene that has remained elusive until now.

Pictured: Robotic surgery
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, July 24, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that the use of surgical robots does not lead to better outcomes in patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer, bringing into question the added costs of the tools.

Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 21, 2014

In this Q&A and video, medical oncologist Mark Dickson discusses his approach to treating sarcoma and melanoma and how he develops individual treatment plans for each patient.

Pictured: Gabriela Chiosis
Finding
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Thursday, July 17, 2014

A small molecule discovered at MSK called PU-H71 blocks the growth of cancer cells and enables doctors to image tumors.

Pictured: William Tap
Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 14, 2014

In this Q&A, medical oncologist William Tap describes Memorial Sloan Kettering’s expertise in providing cutting-edge treatment for people with different types of soft tissue sarcoma.

Pictured: Gum ball machines
Decoder
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Serge Lyashchenko
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, June 27, 2014

The launch of a 20-ton instrument and a facility for producing radioactive imaging molecules will allow our doctors and scientists to monitor cancers in unparalleled detail.

Pictured: Christine Iacobuzio-Donahue, Eileen O’Reilly, Steven Leach, and Peter Allen
Announcement
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 26, 2014

Our new David M. Rubenstein Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research is an ambitious initiative to solve a difficult and complex disease.

Pictured: Peter Allen
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, June 18, 2014

A new drug could make pancreatic surgery safer by reducing the risk of a grave complication.

Pictured: Michael Berger
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Pictured: Activated macrophage
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, June 5, 2014

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
MSK at ASCO
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Our experts offer their perspective in major media outlets on recent research into drug- and cell-based immunotherapies for cancer.

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