Pictured: Paul Sabbatini
Q&A
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Medical oncologist Paul Sabbatini sheds light on how phase I clinical trials are conducted at Memorial Sloan Kettering and how to determine whether patients may be eligible for one.

Pictured: Experimental Brain Tumor
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 18, 2014

Researchers have engineered a gene into therapeutic cells that allows them to turn off tumor growth if some of the cells become cancerous.

Pictured: Nematode Worm Embryo
Snapshot
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, September 11, 2014

Stunning movies captured in the lab of computational biologist Zhirong Bao reveal how cells divide, grow, and move around, as in a carefully choreographed dance, during the development of a nematode worm embryo.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 4, 2014

Researchers have created tiny structures called organoids from patients’ prostate tumors. These organoids will allow the study of tumors in greater detail and enable correlation of genetic mutations with drug response.

In the Clinic
By Jennifer Castoro, BA, Managing/Copy Editor  |  Thursday, September 4, 2014

Researchers have found that in a subset of women, consumption of soy could boost the expression of genes linked to breast cancer.

Pictured: Johanna Joyce
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, August 19, 2014

A new study sheds light on what enables breast cancer cells to spread to the brain and presents a potential target for drugs.

In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, August 11, 2014

Experimental pathologist Jorge Reis-Filho explains how tumor DNA obtained from the blood could lead to noninvasive — yet highly sensitive — ways of detecting and monitoring cancer in the body.

Lab mouse with cultured human pluripotent stem cells
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, August 7, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed a powerful new way to study human disease using stem cells whose genomes can be manipulated at will.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, August 6, 2014

A newly discovered gene mutation appears to be the driving force behind a particularly aggressive form of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer of the skeletal muscle.

Q&A
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, August 4, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigator Ann Zauber answers questions about the risks and benefits of colon cancer screening in the elderly.

Pictured: Richard O’Reilly
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, July 31, 2014

A study shows that treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) with stem cell transplantation is very effective, especially if done early.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 28, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found a naturally occurring compound that can destroy cancer cells in mice by targeting MYC, a cancer-causing gene that has remained elusive until now.

Pictured: Robotic surgery
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, July 24, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that the use of surgical robots does not lead to better outcomes in patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer, bringing into question the added costs of the tools.

Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 21, 2014

In this Q&A and video, medical oncologist Mark Dickson discusses his approach to treating sarcoma and melanoma and how he develops individual treatment plans for each patient.

Pictured: Gabriela Chiosis
Finding
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Thursday, July 17, 2014

A small molecule discovered at MSK called PU-H71 blocks the growth of cancer cells and enables doctors to image tumors.

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