Pictured: Martin Tallman
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Chief of the Leukemia Service Dr. Tallman discusses how experts collaborate to deliver the most-promising therapies, and how he cares for patients as if they were members of his own family.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers
Honor
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Charles Sawyers, Chair of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, is a recipient of the inaugural $3 million prize for groundbreaking achievements in scientific research.

Feature
By Jim Stallard, MA and Julie Grisham, MS
Friday, September 21, 2012

With the genomics revolution, scientists and physicians have increasingly been able to peer at the inner workings of tumor cells and pinpoint the specific genetic changes that transform them from their cells of origin into cancer.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 6, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found why certain drugs are not sufficiently effective in treating leukemias called myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 15, 2012

Researchers have identified a set of genetic abnormalities that can enhance prognostic accuracy and aid treatment selection for people with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Pictured: Hans-Guido Wendel
Profile
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, December 20, 2011

German-born cancer biologist Hans-Guido Wendel is taking advantage of transformative advances in genomics technology to understand key genetic abnormalities in leukemia and lymphoma.

Center News

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