Perspective
By Paul Sabbatini, MD, Deputy Physician-in-Chief for Clinical Research  |  Friday, July 26, 2013

The clinical trial remains our best tool to identify new therapies, but as with all tools, innovation is required if trials are to remain relevant.

Pictured: Mark Kris
In the News
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Medical oncologist Mark G. Kris and one of his patients were interviewed for a CBS This Morning segment that describes how a Memorial Sloan Kettering team trains the supercomputer IBM Watson to help doctors identify the best cancer management options for individual patients.

Pictured:  Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, May 24, 2013

Investigators have sequenced the genome of adenoid cystic carcinoma, a rare and deadly head and neck cancer. The work sets the stage for the sequencing of additional rare cancers at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Pictured: Paul Sabbatini
Q&A
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, April 2, 2013

In his new role as Deputy Physician-in-Chief for Clinical Research, Paul Sabbatini aims to streamline, accelerate, and expand Memorial Sloan Kettering’s clinical research program.

Pictured: Mark Kris
Perspective
By Mark Kris, MD, Chief, Thoracic Oncology Service  |  Friday, February 8, 2013

Medical oncologist Mark Kris discusses how cancer experts are working to train IBM Watson to help assist medical professionals.

Pictured: Kenneth Yu
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, January 29, 2013

New research suggests that analyzing genetic changes found in the bloodstream may help doctors predict which chemotherapy regimens will work for some patients.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers' Laboratory
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, January 7, 2013

The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s notable research advances include the approval of a new drug for men with advanced prostate cancer that was developed and studied by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers.

In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

Pictured: Paul Paik
Finding
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, May 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering was one of the first centers to use this type of genetic testing for lung cancer patients and is currently one of the only centers testing for mutations in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung.

Pictured: American Association of Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2012
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, April 3, 2012

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the world’s oldest and largest professional organization dedicated to advancing cancer research, held its 2012 annual meeting in Chicago.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 15, 2012

Researchers have identified a set of genetic abnormalities that can enhance prognostic accuracy and aid treatment selection for people with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Pictured: Memorial Sloan Kettering logo
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, February 6, 2012

Two of the year’s top five cancer research advances cited by the American Society of Clinical Oncology were led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi & Laetitia Borsu
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have performed the first large-scale genetic analysis of several pediatric cancers, identifying mutations and potential targets for therapies to treat the cancers.

Prediction Tool
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Our ovarian cancer nomogram is a personalized tool that can help you and your doctor make important treatment decisions after surgery.

In the News
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Chief of Thoracic Oncology Mark Kris offers his perspective on a promising new tactic for treating lung and other cancers in this story from CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley. The strategy tailors cancer treatment to each individual patient.

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