In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers & Howard Scher
Announcement
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, August 31, 2012

Enzalutamide, a targeted therapy co-invented by a Memorial Sloan Kettering investigator, has received FDA approval for the treatment of men with metastatic prostate cancer.

Pictured: Robert Motzer
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 21, 2012

Results of an international study indicate that the investigational drug tivozanib is more effective and better tolerated than a currently approved therapy in delaying cancer growth.

Pictured: Robert Motzer
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, February 7, 2012

The recent FDA approval of axitinib provides a viable treatment option for patients who progress on or cannot tolerate the side effects of other approved drugs for the disease.

Pictured: Memorial Sloan Kettering logo
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, February 6, 2012

Two of the year’s top five cancer research advances cited by the American Society of Clinical Oncology were led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers & Howard Scher
In the News
By Media Staff  |  Friday, February 3, 2012

The success of an experimental prostate cancer treatment is an example of how academic research centers are playing a larger role in drug development, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Pictured: Nancy Lee
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, December 19, 2011

People with cancer of the nasopharynx, an area behind the nose, may benefit from a new combination therapy, according to an international study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering radiation oncologist Nancy Y. Lee.

Pictured: David Solit
In the Lab
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Research led by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering has identified a previously unknown mechanism of resistance to the newly approved melanoma drug vemurafenib.

Center News

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