Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung & Jeremy D
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 9, 2014

Common genetic alterations in neuroblastoma tumors may help doctors predict the likelihood the cancer will spread to the brain.

Pictured: Stem cell-derived nerve cells exposed to progerin
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Monday, December 30, 2013

A team of Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists has come up with an approach to make stem-cell-derived neurons rapidly age in a cell culture dish. The breakthrough could transform research into Parkinson’s and other late-onset diseases.

Pictured: Low-dose CT scans
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 26, 2013

The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual report on top clinical cancer advances of the year once again features several studies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers.

Pictured: Charles L. Sawyers, William Polkinghorn & Simon Powell
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 12, 2013

Laboratory studies have revealed an explanation for why androgen-deprivation therapy makes radiation therapy more effective in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, December 9, 2013

A new diagnostic test co-developed by Memorial Sloan Kettering identifies hundreds of genetic alterations in blood cancers, which will guide physicians in treatment decisions.

Pictured: Casper zebrafish
Snapshot
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Physician and cell biologist Richard White has generated a transparent and stripeless strain of zebrafish to study how tumors develop the capacity to metastasize to new organs.

Pictured: Oliver Zivanovic, Garrett Nash & Dennis Chi
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 15, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering experts are leading investigations of a procedure called hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, also known as HIPEC.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, November 13, 2013

The study of some victims exposed to ionizing radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident is yielding new information about how radiation-induced thyroid cancer develops.

Pictured: Sarat Chandarlapaty
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 8, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found genetic mutations that cause some breast cancers to develop resistance to hormone therapy.

Pictured: Laurie Glimcher, Craig Thompson, Marc Tessier-Lavigne & Tadataka Yamada
Announcement
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, October 24, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering is joining with two other academic institutions in a pioneering collaboration to speed early-stage drug discoveries into therapies for patients.

Mouse glioblastoma tumor with phagocytic macrophages
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers say a drug that acts on noncancerous, tumor-infiltrating cells might provide a new treatment option for the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer.

Breast cancer mosaic
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists are developing new imaging instrumentation that could enable pathologist and surgeons to collaborate more seamlessly and reduce the need for repeat surgeries.

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered how a common bacterium can evolve to become more mobile and easier to get rid of.

Pictured: Daniel Thorek & Jan Grimm
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, September 25, 2013

A new imaging approach being investigated by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers could provide better information about a tumor’s molecular activity, allowing for a more accurate diagnosis.

Pictured: Derek Tan
Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 16, 2013

In this Q&A, Memorial Sloan Kettering chemist Derek Tan discusses why natural products offer inspiration for the development of new drugs.

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