Pictured: Noah Kauff
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, March 28, 2014

A study has found that mutations in the gene BRCA1 are associated with an increased likelihood of developing a rare, aggressive form of uterine cancer.

Pictured: Kathryn Beal
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 17, 2014

A high-dose radiation treatment that can be given in one day has become an effective and increasingly common approach for patients with metastatic brain tumors.

Pictured: Jan Grimm
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 10, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers are investigating the use of tiny particles that behave like sponges to take in drugs and deliver them to tumors.

Pictured: Susan Prockop & Lucas T.
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 6, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering physician-scientists have prevented a dangerous complication of stem cell transplantation using immune cells donated from a third party.

Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 3, 2014

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

 Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 27, 2014

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Pictured: Renier Brentjens, Isabelle Rivière & Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 20, 2014

A new study evaluating a cell-based immune therapy to treat an aggressive type of leukemia — the largest study of its kind to date — reports that 88 percent of patients responded to the treatment.

Finding
By Jenifer Goodwin, Freelance Writer  |  Thursday, February 6, 2014

Investigators have found a possible molecular explanation for why obese people with kidney cancer tend to fare better despite having a higher rate of diagnosis.

Pictured: Stephen Solomon
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, January 27, 2014

Irreversible electroporation – a new, minimally invasive treatment that uses electric current to poke tiny holes in cell membranes – is showing promise against hard-to-treat tumors.

In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Obesity in patients with early-stage tongue cancer has been linked to a five-fold increase in the risk of death.

Pictured: Alice Ho
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, January 20, 2014

A new approach for treating breast cancer spreads radiation doses over a larger number of beams, providing more thorough coverage.

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung & Jeremy D
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 9, 2014

Common genetic alterations in neuroblastoma tumors may help doctors predict the likelihood the cancer will spread to the brain.

Pictured: Stem cell-derived nerve cells exposed to progerin
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Monday, December 30, 2013

A team of Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists has come up with an approach to make stem-cell-derived neurons rapidly age in a cell culture dish. The breakthrough could transform research into Parkinson’s and other late-onset diseases.

Pictured: Low-dose CT scans
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 26, 2013

The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual report on top clinical cancer advances of the year once again features several studies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers.

Pictured: Charles L. Sawyers, William Polkinghorn & Simon Powell
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 12, 2013

Laboratory studies have revealed an explanation for why androgen-deprivation therapy makes radiation therapy more effective in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

Center News

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