Pictured: Peter Allen
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, June 18, 2014

A new drug could make pancreatic surgery safer by reducing the risk of a grave complication.

Pictured: Michael Berger
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Pictured: Activated macrophage
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, June 5, 2014

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Pictured: Helen McArthur
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, June 3, 2014

The treatment combines a technique called cryoablation, or freezing of the tumor, with an immunotherapy drug.

Pictured: Tari King
In the News
By Jennifer Bassett, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 22, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering breast surgeon Tari King talks to CBS Online about a new study suggesting double mastectomies may be performed unnecessarily in many women.

Pictured: Macrophage & Tumor Cells
Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 1, 2014

Approaches used for research into the social lives of bacteria can also be used to explore how tumors behave and evolve.

Pictured: Michelle Bradbury
Q&A
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, April 24, 2014

A new optical-imaging approach could enable surgeons to more precisely visualize cancerous tissue during an operation.

Pictured: José Baselga
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 10, 2014

Discoveries made at Memorial Sloan Kettering receive recognition at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Pictured: Human cell nucleus
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The discovery of a molecular process that slows down cell division could provide new understanding about how some cancers develop.

Pictured: Douglas Levine
Finding
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that appears to cause a rare but very aggressive type of ovarian cancer in young women.

Pictured: Noah Kauff
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, March 28, 2014

A study has found that mutations in the gene BRCA1 are associated with an increased likelihood of developing a rare, aggressive form of uterine cancer.

Pictured: Kathryn Beal
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 17, 2014

A high-dose radiation treatment that can be given in one day has become an effective and increasingly common approach for patients with metastatic brain tumors.

Pictured: Jan Grimm
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 10, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers are investigating the use of tiny particles that behave like sponges to take in drugs and deliver them to tumors.

Pictured: Susan Prockop & Lucas T.
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 6, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering physician-scientists have prevented a dangerous complication of stem cell transplantation using immune cells donated from a third party.

Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 3, 2014

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

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