Pictured: Jorge Reis-Filho and Britta Weigelt
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Genetic alterations linked to a rare salivary cancer could also shed light on more common malignancies.

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 21, 2014

MSK researchers discover that the body senses and attacks harmful bacteria indirectly after the pathogens cause stress within the cells.

Pictured: Ping Chi
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, October 9, 2014

Genetic analysis reveals biomarkers and possible drug targets for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

Pictured: Scott Lowe
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 30, 2014

In taking a new approach to finding treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, MSK scientists have uncovered a potential drug target for this highly aggressive cancer.

Pictured: Nematode Worm Embryo
Snapshot
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, September 11, 2014

Stunning movies captured in the lab of computational biologist Zhirong Bao reveal how cells divide, grow, and move around, as in a carefully choreographed dance, during the development of a nematode worm embryo.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 4, 2014

Researchers have created tiny structures called organoids from patients’ prostate tumors. These organoids will allow the study of tumors in greater detail and enable correlation of genetic mutations with drug response.

Pictured: Johanna Joyce
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, August 19, 2014

A new study sheds light on what enables breast cancer cells to spread to the brain and presents a potential target for drugs.

Lab mouse with cultured human pluripotent stem cells
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, August 7, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed a powerful new way to study human disease using stem cells whose genomes can be manipulated at will.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, August 6, 2014

A newly discovered gene mutation appears to be the driving force behind a particularly aggressive form of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer of the skeletal muscle.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 28, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found a naturally occurring compound that can destroy cancer cells in mice by targeting MYC, a cancer-causing gene that has remained elusive until now.

Pictured: Gabriela Chiosis
Finding
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Thursday, July 17, 2014

A small molecule discovered at MSK called PU-H71 blocks the growth of cancer cells and enables doctors to image tumors.

Pictured: Gum ball machines
Decoder
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Michael Berger
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Pictured: Activated macrophage
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, June 5, 2014

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Pictured: Macrophage & Tumor Cells
Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 1, 2014

Approaches used for research into the social lives of bacteria can also be used to explore how tumors behave and evolve.

Center News

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