In the Clinic
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 11, 2012

In the most rigorous analysis of its kind to date, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers find acupuncture to be an effective therapy for several types of pain.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 6, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found why certain drugs are not sufficiently effective in treating leukemias called myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Pictured: José Baselga
Announcement
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Internationally recognized physician-scientist José Baselga has been named Physician-in-Chief of Memorial Hospital. He joins Memorial Sloan Kettering from Massachusetts General Hospital.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers & Howard Scher
Announcement
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, August 31, 2012

Enzalutamide, a targeted therapy co-invented by a Memorial Sloan Kettering investigator, has received FDA approval for the treatment of men with metastatic prostate cancer.

Pictured: Filippo Giancotti
In the Lab
By Media Staff  |  Friday, August 24, 2012

A new Memorial Sloan Kettering study has identified one of the proteins fueling the spread of some breast cancers, and researchers hope their findings will lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and drugs.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit & Zsofia Stadler
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, August 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators have found that some testicular cancers arising early in life may result from genetic changes that have not been inherited from either parent.

Pictured: Tari King
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Dr. King talks about her research investigating why certain women develop breast cancer and about the long-term relationships she maintains with her patients.

Pictured: Joao Xavier and Eric Pamer
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, July 19, 2012

New studies investigate how the use of antibiotics affects the balance of both harmful and beneficial bacteria in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière and Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s trial to evaluate a new therapy for patients with beta-thalassemia is the first to receive FDA approval to treat this disease with genetically engineered cells.

Pictured: Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum
In the O.R.
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 9, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering surgeons have pioneered a technique that may improve quality of life for women with early-stage gynecologic cancers.

Pictured: Joan Massagué
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, July 6, 2012

A team of investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering has shown for the first time that tumor growth, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance are connected to the same molecular changes inside breast cancer cells.

Pictured: Farid Boulad
Profile
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Monday, July 2, 2012

Pediatric Day Hospital Medical Director Farid Boulad explains that “we’re trying to excel at caring for the entire child, physically and emotionally.

Pictured: Helena Furberg
Finding
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor and Irene Jarchum, PhD
Wednesday, June 27, 2012

In the largest study of genes and smoking performed in a minority population to date, researchers have discovered a gene variant that increases a person’s risk of smoking.

Pictured: Douglas Levine and Petar Jelinic
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators hope their new web tool will improve the accessibility of large-scale genome-sequencing information for cancer researchers everywhere, and accelerate research and therapeutic discovery.

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