Pictured: Nadeem Abu-Rustum
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Monday, October 22, 2012

Dr. Abu-Rustum, Director of Minimally Invasive Surgery for the Gynecology Service, discusses how the gynecologic cancer care team treats each woman with an individualized approach.

Pictured: Lisa DeAngelis
Honor
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, October 19, 2012

Dr. DeAngelis has been elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), considered one of the highest honors in the field of health and medicine.

Pictured: Patient James
Patient Story
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, October 15, 2012

James had advanced melanoma and dwindling treatment options when his doctors enrolled him in a clinical trial of an innovative immunotherapy developed at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Pictured: Robin Roberts
In the News
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, October 11, 2012

Good Morning America co-host Robin Roberts recently said good-bye to her inpatient treatment team at Memorial Sloan Kettering after undergoing a stem cell transplant to treat myelodysplastic syndrome.

Pictured: Carol Lee
Q&A
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, October 10, 2012

During Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Dr. Lee discusses mammography, breast MRI, and breast ultrasound.

Pictured: Richard Barakat
Honor
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, October 1, 2012

Dr. Barakat will serve as president of two prestigious societies for gynecologic cancer, allowing him to influence how women with these cancers are cared for both in the United States and around the world.

Feature
By Jim Stallard, MA and Julie Grisham, MS
Friday, September 21, 2012

With the genomics revolution, scientists and physicians have increasingly been able to peer at the inner workings of tumor cells and pinpoint the specific genetic changes that transform them from their cells of origin into cancer.

Pictured: Tunneling Nanotubes
Snapshot
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered a way that cancer cells may be able to exchange information by establishing long bridges between cells called tunneling nanotubes.

In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 6, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found why certain drugs are not sufficiently effective in treating leukemias called myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers & Howard Scher
Announcement
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, August 31, 2012

Enzalutamide, a targeted therapy co-invented by a Memorial Sloan Kettering investigator, has received FDA approval for the treatment of men with metastatic prostate cancer.

Pictured: John Healey
Announcement
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, August 29, 2012

We recently launched our first-ever television advertising campaign, which offers a sense of the passion and compassion that defines how we care for people with cancer.

Pictured: David Finley
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Dr. Finley, Co-Director of the Complex Airway Program, explains how he lays out a treatment plan with his patients, and determines which type of surgery fits best in the context of their lifestyle.

Pictured: Filippo Giancotti
In the Lab
By Media Staff  |  Friday, August 24, 2012

A new Memorial Sloan Kettering study has identified one of the proteins fueling the spread of some breast cancers, and researchers hope their findings will lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and drugs.

Center News

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