Pictured: Isabelle Rivière, Michel Sadelain & Renier Brentjens
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have used genetically modified immune cells to eradicate cancer in five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Pictured: ESK1 Monoclonal Antibody
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Scientists from Memorial Sloan Kettering have collaborated on the discovery of a unique monoclonal antibody, called ESK1, that appears to be effective at targeting and destroying several types of cancer cells.

Pictured: BCG
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, February 1, 2013

Researchers have shed light on how an important treatment for early-stage bladder cancer enters cancer cells to eradicate them.

Pictured: Prasad Adusumilli
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 3, 2013

A team from Memorial Sloan Kettering has found that the makeup of immune cells in a lung tumor and in tissue surrounding a tumor can predict whether the cancer will recur after surgery.

Pictured: Marcel R. M. van den Brink
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have shown for the first time that administering a growth factor called interleukin-7 can help patients regenerate T cells more quickly after stem cell transplantation.

Pictured: Michel Sadelain
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have reported a new method that could allow the development of more-specific, cell-based therapies for cancer.

Pictured: Ming Li
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 14, 2012

Recent findings by Memorial Sloan Kettering immunologists might one day pave the way for new strategies to control a range of diseases, including autoimmune disorders and cancer.

Pictured: Michel Sadelain & Jedd Wolchok
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Physician-scientists Michel Sadelain and Jedd Wolchok have been appointed to a new research team dedicated to investigating ways to harness the immune system to fight cancer.

Pictured: Alexander Rudensky
Announcement
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Dr. Rudensky studies the development of white blood cells called T lymphocytes, which participate in the immune system response to infection. He joined the Sloan Kettering Institute in 2009.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Joao Xavier and Eric Pamer
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, July 19, 2012

New studies investigate how the use of antibiotics affects the balance of both harmful and beneficial bacteria in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière and Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s trial to evaluate a new therapy for patients with beta-thalassemia is the first to receive FDA approval to treat this disease with genetically engineered cells.

Pictured: Nikola Pavletich and Alexander Rudensky
Honor
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Structural Biology Program Chair Nikola P. Pavletich and immunologist Alexander Y. Rudensky have received one of the highest honors given to scientists working in the United States.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok and James Allison
In the News
By Media Staff  |  Friday, April 20, 2012

In an article describing the history and promise of immunotherapy for cancer treatment, the magazine highlights the groundbreaking work of James Allison, Chair of the Sloan Kettering Institute’s Immunology Program, and medical oncologist and immunologist Jedd Wolchok.

Pictured: T cells on surface on thymus
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 6, 2012

A recent study holds promise for the development of a new type of drug to alleviate immune deficiency caused by cancer treatment, radiation injury, or certain diseases.

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