Pictured: Scott Armstrong, Michael Kuehn, Haijhua Chu, Monica Cusan & Andrei Kritsov
Profile
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, July 12, 2013

Scott Armstrong specializes in the treatment of leukemia in children. His research focuses on the disease in children and adults.

Pictured: Christina Leslie
Profile
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, June 28, 2013

Christina Leslie develops computational and statistical methods to study gene expression in normal cells and in cancer cells.

Pictured:  Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, May 24, 2013

Investigators have sequenced the genome of adenoid cystic carcinoma, a rare and deadly head and neck cancer. The work sets the stage for the sequencing of additional rare cancers at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Pictured: Douglas Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, May 1, 2013

An analysis of endometrial cancers reveals genetic information that should improve diagnosis and guide treatments for women with an aggressive form of the disease.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit
Finding
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 28, 2013

A study identifies genetic variations that alter the risk of breast cancer in women who have a certain gene mutation.

Pictured: BCG
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, February 1, 2013

Researchers have shed light on how an important treatment for early-stage bladder cancer enters cancer cells to eradicate them.

Pictured: X-ray Image
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Scientists have identified genes and biological mechanisms that one day could be targeted with drugs to stop kidney cancer from spreading to the bone, brain, or other organs.

Pictured: Michael Berger & David Solit
Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 26, 2012

At Memorial Sloan Kettering, new technologies to study gene changes in cancer cells are accelerating the development and implementation of more-effective treatments.

Pictured: Scott Lowe
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 19, 2012

In the lab of cancer biologist Scott Lowe, researchers are investigating the processes that naturally inhibit cancer development.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi & Snjezana Dogan
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 9, 2012

A genetic analysis of tumors suggests women are more susceptible than men to the most common form of lung cancer.

Pictured: Ping Chi
Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 2, 2012

Dr. Chi, a physician-scientist and member of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, studies genetic and epigenetic changes that cause cancer.

Feature
By Jim Stallard, MA and Julie Grisham, MS
Friday, September 21, 2012

With the genomics revolution, scientists and physicians have increasingly been able to peer at the inner workings of tumor cells and pinpoint the specific genetic changes that transform them from their cells of origin into cancer.

In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 6, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found why certain drugs are not sufficiently effective in treating leukemias called myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

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