Feature
By Jim Stallard, MA and Julie Grisham, MS
Friday, September 21, 2012

With the genomics revolution, scientists and physicians have increasingly been able to peer at the inner workings of tumor cells and pinpoint the specific genetic changes that transform them from their cells of origin into cancer.

In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 6, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found why certain drugs are not sufficiently effective in treating leukemias called myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit & Zsofia Stadler
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, August 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators have found that some testicular cancers arising early in life may result from genetic changes that have not been inherited from either parent.

Pictured: Joan Massagué
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, July 6, 2012

A team of investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering has shown for the first time that tumor growth, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance are connected to the same molecular changes inside breast cancer cells.

Pictured: Helena Furberg
Finding
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor and Irene Jarchum, PhD
Wednesday, June 27, 2012

In the largest study of genes and smoking performed in a minority population to date, researchers have discovered a gene variant that increases a person’s risk of smoking.

Pictured: Douglas Levine and Petar Jelinic
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators hope their new web tool will improve the accessibility of large-scale genome-sequencing information for cancer researchers everywhere, and accelerate research and therapeutic discovery.

Pictured: Paul Paik
Finding
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, May 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering was one of the first centers to use this type of genetic testing for lung cancer patients and is currently one of the only centers testing for mutations in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 15, 2012

Researchers have identified a set of genetic abnormalities that can enhance prognostic accuracy and aid treatment selection for people with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, March 13, 2012

In a large-scale genome-sequencing study, researchers have discovered mutations in neuroblastoma tumors that could aid the development of diagnostic tests and therapies.

Pictured: Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering studies provide new clues about genetic mutations that affect cell behavior and play a role in several types of cancer.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi & Laetitia Borsu
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 1, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have performed the first large-scale genetic analysis of several pediatric cancers, identifying mutations and potential targets for therapies to treat the cancers.

Pictured: Hans-Guido Wendel
Profile
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, December 20, 2011

German-born cancer biologist Hans-Guido Wendel is taking advantage of transformative advances in genomics technology to understand key genetic abnormalities in leukemia and lymphoma.

Pictured: Breast tumor treated with paclitaxel
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 2, 2011

Recent findings by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators suggest it might be possible to improve the effectiveness of chemotherapy for breast cancer by combining the treatment with a new type of drug called a cathepsin inhibitor.

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