Pictured: Lawrence Dauer
In the O.R.
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering clinicians report on a successful first year of using a new procedure to pinpoint and remove small breast cancers.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit
In the Lab
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Monday, September 9, 2013

Researchers have found the first evidence that susceptibility to developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia during childhood may be heritable.

Pictured: Cancer cell lines
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, August 26, 2013

A recent study found that the cell lines most commonly used for research on ovarian cancer are not the most suitable.

Pictured: Robert J. Motzer
In the Clinic
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Thursday, August 22, 2013

An international study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering found that pazopanib (Votrient®) controls cancer as effectively as sunitinib (Sutent®) while improving patients’ quality of life.

Pictured: Micropapillary Morphology
In the Lab
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, August 9, 2013

A Memorial Sloan Kettering study shows that an abnormal cell pattern found in the tumor tissue of some lung cancer patients may help to predict which tumors are more likely to recur after surgery.

Pictured: Clostridium difficile
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Information about the microbiome, the genes of all the microorganisms that naturally inhabit the human body, is leading to new approaches for treating infections in cancer patients.

In the Clinic
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, June 19, 2013

A Memorial Sloan Kettering study suggests that lymphedema of the arm, a swelling that can occur following breast cancer treatment, may be reduced by acupuncture.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok & Richard Carvajal
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, June 3, 2013

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering studies that hold promise for the treatment of advanced uveal (eye) melanoma and advanced skin melanoma are making headlines at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Pictured: Three-dimensional structure of the protein mTOR
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 30, 2013

In an eagerly awaited study, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers report on the molecular structure of mTOR, a protein commonly mutated in cancer.

Pictured:  Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, May 24, 2013

Investigators have sequenced the genome of adenoid cystic carcinoma, a rare and deadly head and neck cancer. The work sets the stage for the sequencing of additional rare cancers at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Pictured: Paul Russo
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, May 20, 2013

A study has found that the majority of kidney cancer patients with small tumors have their entire kidney removed, which can increase the risk of developing chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications.

Pictured: Melanocytes
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed innovative ways to study some skin diseases, including melanoma skin cancer.

Pictured: Douglas Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, May 1, 2013

An analysis of endometrial cancers reveals genetic information that should improve diagnosis and guide treatments for women with an aggressive form of the disease.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Research suggests that a new drug could be effective in patients with prostate cancer who develop resistance to the targeted therapy enzalutamide.

Pictured: Gary Schwartz & Mark Dickson
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 22, 2013

Two clinical trials of targeted therapies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators show promising results against different types of sarcoma.

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