Pictured: Douglas Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, May 1, 2013

An analysis of endometrial cancers reveals genetic information that should improve diagnosis and guide treatments for women with an aggressive form of the disease.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Research suggests that a new drug could be effective in patients with prostate cancer who develop resistance to the targeted therapy enzalutamide.

Pictured: Gary Schwartz & Mark Dickson
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 22, 2013

Two clinical trials of targeted therapies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators show promising results against different types of sarcoma.

Pictured: Andrew Vickers
Finding
By Allyson Collins, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 17, 2013

A study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators indicates nearly half of all prostate cancer deaths by age 75 occur in a small group of men with high PSA levels at age 45.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 4, 2013

Early research led by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering cautions against combining ipilimumab and vemurafenib for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit
Finding
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 28, 2013

A study identifies genetic variations that alter the risk of breast cancer in women who have a certain gene mutation.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière, Michel Sadelain & Renier Brentjens
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have used genetically modified immune cells to eradicate cancer in five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Pictured: ESK1 Monoclonal Antibody
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Scientists from Memorial Sloan Kettering have collaborated on the discovery of a unique monoclonal antibody, called ESK1, that appears to be effective at targeting and destroying several types of cancer cells.

Pictured: James Fagin
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, February 14, 2013

Researchers have found that the investigational drug selumetinib shuts down the signaling of genetic mutations that prevent some patients’ thyroid cancer tumors from absorbing radioiodine, the most effective treatment for the disease.

Pictured: Neurons
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, February 11, 2013

Researchers have clarified the process by which developing nerve cells are directed to specialize into distinct parts.

Pictured: BCG
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, February 1, 2013

Researchers have shed light on how an important treatment for early-stage bladder cancer enters cancer cells to eradicate them.

Pictured: Kenneth Yu
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, January 29, 2013

New research suggests that analyzing genetic changes found in the bloodstream may help doctors predict which chemotherapy regimens will work for some patients.

Pictured: Mark Bilsky
In the O.R.
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, January 25, 2013

Our doctors have shown that tumors compressing the spinal cord can be controlled using less-invasive surgery combined with a precise, intense form of radiation therapy.

Pictured: Prasad Adusumilli
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 3, 2013

A team from Memorial Sloan Kettering has found that the makeup of immune cells in a lung tumor and in tissue surrounding a tumor can predict whether the cancer will recur after surgery.

Pictured: Marcel R. M. van den Brink
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have shown for the first time that administering a growth factor called interleukin-7 can help patients regenerate T cells more quickly after stem cell transplantation.

Center News

Stay Informed

Get the latest information about cancer care and research every month.