Pictured: Michael Zelefsky
In the Clinic
By Andrea Peirce, BA and Media Staff
Friday, November 30, 2012

Study signals hope for maintaining sexual function in men undergoing radiation treatment for prostate cancer.

Pictured: PET Scan
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 15, 2012

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering are developing a new strategy for PET imaging of tumors that could result in new tools to detect and monitor prostate cancer.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi & Snjezana Dogan
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 9, 2012

A genetic analysis of tumors suggests women are more susceptible than men to the most common form of lung cancer.

Pictured: Martin Weiser
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 8, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s colorectal cancer team has developed online prediction tools that assess disease risk following surgery, enabling patients and physicians to make better treatment decisions.

Pictured: Structure of Synthesized Erythropoietin
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, October 8, 2012

Researchers have produced a fully synthetic, functional version of erythropoietin, the hormone that controls production of red blood cells.

Pictured: Tunneling Nanotubes
Snapshot
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered a way that cancer cells may be able to exchange information by establishing long bridges between cells called tunneling nanotubes.

In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

In the Clinic
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 11, 2012

In the most rigorous analysis of its kind to date, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers find acupuncture to be an effective therapy for several types of pain.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 6, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found why certain drugs are not sufficiently effective in treating leukemias called myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Filippo Giancotti
In the Lab
By Media Staff  |  Friday, August 24, 2012

A new Memorial Sloan Kettering study has identified one of the proteins fueling the spread of some breast cancers, and researchers hope their findings will lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and drugs.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit & Zsofia Stadler
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, August 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators have found that some testicular cancers arising early in life may result from genetic changes that have not been inherited from either parent.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière and Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s trial to evaluate a new therapy for patients with beta-thalassemia is the first to receive FDA approval to treat this disease with genetically engineered cells.

Pictured: Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum
In the O.R.
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 9, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering surgeons have pioneered a technique that may improve quality of life for women with early-stage gynecologic cancers.

Pictured: Joan Massagué
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, July 6, 2012

A team of investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering has shown for the first time that tumor growth, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance are connected to the same molecular changes inside breast cancer cells.

Center News

Stay Informed

Get the latest information about cancer care and research every month.