Pictured: Ping Chi
Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 2, 2012

Dr. Chi, a physician-scientist and member of the Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, studies genetic and epigenetic changes that cause cancer.

Pictured: Cycle for Survival
Event
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Thursday, October 25, 2012

Organizers expect this year to be the most successful yet for this national indoor team cycling event, which raises funds for rare cancer research at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Pictured: Lisa DeAngelis
Honor
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, October 19, 2012

Dr. DeAngelis has been elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), considered one of the highest honors in the field of health and medicine.

Pictured: Zuckerman Research Center
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s new research complex contains more than 100 laboratories, nearly doubling the space we dedicate to research to better understand and treat cancer.

Research
Pictured: Structure of Synthesized Erythropoietin
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, October 8, 2012

Researchers have produced a fully synthetic, functional version of erythropoietin, the hormone that controls production of red blood cells.

Pictured: Alexander Rudensky
Announcement
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Dr. Rudensky studies the development of white blood cells called T lymphocytes, which participate in the immune system response to infection. He joined the Sloan Kettering Institute in 2009.

Feature
By Jim Stallard, MA and Julie Grisham, MS
Friday, September 21, 2012

With the genomics revolution, scientists and physicians have increasingly been able to peer at the inner workings of tumor cells and pinpoint the specific genetic changes that transform them from their cells of origin into cancer.

Pictured: Tunneling Nanotubes
Snapshot
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered a way that cancer cells may be able to exchange information by establishing long bridges between cells called tunneling nanotubes.

In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

Pictured: 2011 Annual Report
Announcement
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Thursday, September 13, 2012

Our Annual Report features ten of the year’s most important research and clinical advances, the result of work led by physician-scientists and basic-science investigators.

In the Clinic
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 11, 2012

In the most rigorous analysis of its kind to date, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers find acupuncture to be an effective therapy for several types of pain.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 6, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found why certain drugs are not sufficiently effective in treating leukemias called myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Pictured: José Baselga
Announcement
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Internationally recognized physician-scientist José Baselga has been named Physician-in-Chief of Memorial Hospital. He joins Memorial Sloan Kettering from Massachusetts General Hospital.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers & Howard Scher
Announcement
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, August 31, 2012

Enzalutamide, a targeted therapy co-invented by a Memorial Sloan Kettering investigator, has received FDA approval for the treatment of men with metastatic prostate cancer.

Center News

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