Q&A
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, August 4, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigator Ann Zauber answers questions about the risks and benefits of colon cancer screening in the elderly.

Pictured: Julio Garcia-Aguilar
Ask the Expert
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Tuesday, March 25, 2014

In this Ask the Expert feature, colorectal surgeon Julio Garcia-Aguilar discusses the differences between laparoscopy and robotic surgery and explains which patients are the best candidates for these procedures.

Pictured: Joanne Frankel Kelvin, Nadeem  Abu-Rustum & Larissa Temple
Video
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 16, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering experts discuss the impact that cancer and its treatment can have on female fertility, and options for building a family after treatment ends.

Q&A
By Andrea Peirce, BA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, June 14, 2013

Therapies are often available for women dealing with sexual and vaginal health concerns related to cancer and its treatment.

Pictured: David Finley & Maria Teresa Ruiz Tsukazan
Feature
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Monday, February 25, 2013

Our doctors introduce and apply advanced technologies in minimal-access surgery to benefit patients.

Pictured: Martin Weiser
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 8, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s colorectal cancer team has developed online prediction tools that assess disease risk following surgery, enabling patients and physicians to make better treatment decisions.

Feature
By Jim Stallard, MA and Julie Grisham, MS
Friday, September 21, 2012

With the genomics revolution, scientists and physicians have increasingly been able to peer at the inner workings of tumor cells and pinpoint the specific genetic changes that transform them from their cells of origin into cancer.

Pictured: Ann Zauber
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS and Julie Grisham, MS
Thursday, February 23, 2012

For the first time, a new study has shown that removing polyps by colonoscopy not only prevents colorectal cancer from developing, but also prevents deaths from the disease.

In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 17, 2011

A new study has found that the overall colonoscopy screening rate has improved by 20 percent in five years among underserved and uninsured New Yorkers aged 50 years and older.

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