Cancer genomics researcher Timothy Chan
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, April 16, 2015

According to an MSK study, a powerful immunotherapy drug for lung cancer works better in people whose tumors carry a lot of mutations caused by tobacco smoke.

MSK investigators Joan Massagué and Anna Obenauf
In the Lab
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, April 9, 2015

A new study led by MSK investigators reveals how some cancer cells become resistant to targeted treatment and suggests what might be done to stop that from happening.

Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Learn about five hot science areas that are changing the way we understand and treat cancer.

CAR T cell immunotherapy
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Cell therapies that use patients’ own immune cells to attack cancer are a promising and rapidly growing area of research.

Exceptional responders of new drugs in clinical trials.
Decoder
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, March 24, 2015

When a clinical trial of a new drug fails because most patients don’t respond, progress can still be made by analyzing the tumors of the rare patients who benefit.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 12, 2015

Physician-scientist Charles Sawyers played a pivotal role in the development of Gleevec, one of the first successful targeted drugs for cancer.

Christina Leslie and John Petrini
Announcement
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 12, 2015

MSK’s Functional Genomics Initiative will enable basic scientists to take full advantage of the massive amount of data produced by tumor sequencing.

Fibrous extensions of a nerve cell (red) and an oligodendrocyte (green) growing on top of the nerve cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 5, 2015

In a recent study, Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists used stem-cell engineering to repair brain injuries in rats. The results raise hope for future therapies that could prevent or fix nerve damage in cancer patients who need brain radiation.

Pictured: Michael Zelefsky
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD and Jim Stallard, MA
Monday, February 2, 2015

Researchers call for intensified efforts to help men with prostate cancer quit smoking after a recent MSK study revealed that patients who smoke during radiation therapy face a higher risk of both having the disease return and dying from it.

Epigenetics
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, January 30, 2015

An experimental drug for acute myelogenous leukemia might potentially help many more patients than previously thought by controlling epigenetic processes, according to a recent MSK study.

In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, January 28, 2015

An annual report from an influential cancer group highlights three MSK studies that have advanced cancer research.

Neurons created from embryonic stem cells
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 22, 2015

A new tool called optogenetics is revealing clues about the function of a promising experimental therapy derived from stem cells.

Sandra D’Angelo and Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, January 6, 2015

A new treatment for advanced melanoma is the latest promising advance in immunotherapy tested in large part by our scientists.

Stained pathology slides of a patient’s tumor (right) and of an organoid made from that tumor (left).
In the Lab
By Christina Pernambuco-Holsten, MA, Managing Web Editor  |  Tuesday, December 30, 2014

From tropical plants and 3-D snapshots of worms to tiny particles that light up tumors, here’s a glimpse at some of the fascinating work MSK researchers pursued in 2014 as part of our quest to advance cancer science.

Pictured: Eytan Stein
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 11, 2014

An experimental drug for blood cancers with certain genetic mutations is showing promise in early-stage trials.

Center News

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