In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 28, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found a naturally occurring compound that can destroy cancer cells in mice by targeting MYC, a cancer-causing gene that has remained elusive until now.

Pictured: Gabriela Chiosis
Finding
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Thursday, July 17, 2014

A small molecule discovered at MSK called PU-H71 blocks the growth of cancer cells and enables doctors to image tumors.

Pictured: Gum ball machines
Decoder
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Michael Berger
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Pictured: Activated macrophage
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, June 5, 2014

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Pictured: Macrophage & Tumor Cells
Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 1, 2014

Approaches used for research into the social lives of bacteria can also be used to explore how tumors behave and evolve.

Pictured: Michelle Bradbury
Q&A
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, April 24, 2014

A new optical-imaging approach could enable surgeons to more precisely visualize cancerous tissue during an operation.

Pictured: José Baselga
Announcement
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 10, 2014

Discoveries made at Memorial Sloan Kettering receive recognition at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Pictured: Human cell nucleus
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The discovery of a molecular process that slows down cell division could provide new understanding about how some cancers develop.

Pictured: Douglas Levine
Finding
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that appears to cause a rare but very aggressive type of ovarian cancer in young women.

Pictured: Jan Grimm
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 10, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers are investigating the use of tiny particles that behave like sponges to take in drugs and deliver them to tumors.

 Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 27, 2014

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung & Jeremy D
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 9, 2014

Common genetic alterations in neuroblastoma tumors may help doctors predict the likelihood the cancer will spread to the brain.

Pictured: Charles L. Sawyers, William Polkinghorn & Simon Powell
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 12, 2013

Laboratory studies have revealed an explanation for why androgen-deprivation therapy makes radiation therapy more effective in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, December 9, 2013

A new diagnostic test co-developed by Memorial Sloan Kettering identifies hundreds of genetic alterations in blood cancers, which will guide physicians in treatment decisions.

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