Exceptional responders of new drugs in clinical trials.
Decoder
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, March 24, 2015

When a clinical trial of a new drug fails because most patients don’t respond, progress can still be made by analyzing the tumors of the rare patients who benefit.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, March 12, 2015

Physician-scientist Charles Sawyers played a pivotal role in the development of Gleevec, one of the first successful targeted drugs for cancer.

Christina Leslie and John Petrini
Announcement
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 12, 2015

MSK’s Functional Genomics Initiative will enable basic scientists to take full advantage of the massive amount of data produced by tumor sequencing.

In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, January 28, 2015

An annual report from an influential cancer group highlights three MSK studies that have advanced cancer research.

Stained pathology slides of a patient’s tumor (right) and of an organoid made from that tumor (left).
In the Lab
By Christina Pernambuco-Holsten, MA, Managing Web Editor  |  Tuesday, December 30, 2014

From tropical plants and 3-D snapshots of worms to tiny particles that light up tumors, here’s a glimpse at some of the fascinating work MSK researchers pursued in 2014 as part of our quest to advance cancer science.

(From left) MSK investigators Michael Berger, José Baselga, and Maurizio Scaltriti, and graduate student Pau Castel.
Finding
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 17, 2014

A study of one patient’s disease has clarified why tumors stop responding to a class of experimental drugs called PI3K inhibitors.

Pictured: William Lee, Chris Sander & Nils Weinhold
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 13, 2014

In a study of patient tumor samples, researchers have found common mutations in parts of the genome that control gene regulation.

Gregory Riely
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, November 12, 2014

MSK lung cancer patients benefit from a powerful genomic test that looks for mutations in 341 genes to help determine the best treatment.

Pictured: Jorge Reis-Filho and Britta Weigelt
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Genetic alterations linked to a rare salivary cancer could also shed light on more common malignancies.

Pictured: Ping Chi
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, October 9, 2014

Genetic analysis reveals biomarkers and possible drug targets for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

Pictured: Scott Lowe
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 30, 2014

In taking a new approach to finding treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, MSK scientists have uncovered a potential drug target for this highly aggressive cancer.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 4, 2014

Researchers have created tiny structures called organoids from patients’ prostate tumors. These organoids will allow the study of tumors in greater detail and enable correlation of genetic mutations with drug response.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, August 6, 2014

A newly discovered gene mutation appears to be the driving force behind a particularly aggressive form of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer of the skeletal muscle.

Pictured: Gum ball machines
Decoder
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Michael Berger
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Center News

Stay Informed

Get the latest information about cancer care and research every month.