Pictured: Jose Baselga and Maurizio Scaltriti
Finding
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, November 17, 2014

A study of one patient’s disease has clarified why tumors stop responding to a class of experimental drugs called PI3K inhibitors.

Pictured: William Lee, Chris Sander & Nils Weinhold
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, November 13, 2014

In a study of patient tumor samples, researchers have found common mutations in parts of the genome that control gene regulation.

Gregory Riely
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, November 12, 2014

MSK lung cancer patients benefit from a powerful genomic test that looks for mutations in 341 genes to help determine the best treatment.

Pictured: Jorge Reis-Filho and Britta Weigelt
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Genetic alterations linked to a rare salivary cancer could also shed light on more common malignancies.

Pictured: Ping Chi
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, October 9, 2014

Genetic analysis reveals biomarkers and possible drug targets for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors.

Pictured: Scott Lowe
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 30, 2014

In taking a new approach to finding treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, MSK scientists have uncovered a potential drug target for this highly aggressive cancer.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 4, 2014

Researchers have created tiny structures called organoids from patients’ prostate tumors. These organoids will allow the study of tumors in greater detail and enable correlation of genetic mutations with drug response.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, August 6, 2014

A newly discovered gene mutation appears to be the driving force behind a particularly aggressive form of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer of the skeletal muscle.

Pictured: Gum ball machines
Decoder
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Pictured: Michael Berger
In the Clinic
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Pictured: David Solit
Profile
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, May 27, 2014

David Solit, Director of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, discusses how working with cancer patients drives him to develop more-effective, personalized cancer treatments.

Pictured: Mark Kris
Finding
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, May 21, 2014

A new study has found that driver mutations can be found in about two-thirds of lung adenocarcinomas, suggesting options for treatment with targeted therapies.

Pictured: José Baselga, Agnès Viale,  Michael Berger & David Solit
Announcement
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, May 20, 2014

With the creation of the Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering sets out to deliver on the promise of personalized medicine by creating better treatment options for all people with cancer.

Pictured: Douglas Levine
Finding
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that appears to cause a rare but very aggressive type of ovarian cancer in young women.

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung & Jeremy D
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 9, 2014

Common genetic alterations in neuroblastoma tumors may help doctors predict the likelihood the cancer will spread to the brain.

Center News

Stay Informed

Get the latest information about cancer care and research every month.