Pictured: Activated macrophage
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Thursday, June 5, 2014

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Pictured: Macrophage & Tumor Cells
Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 1, 2014

Approaches used for research into the social lives of bacteria can also be used to explore how tumors behave and evolve.

 Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 27, 2014

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Pictured: Alexander Rudensky
Profile
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Monday, December 16, 2013

Alexander Rudensky’s research focuses on the role of a subset of white blood cells called regulatory T cells, which are believed to suppress the immune system’s ability to fight tumors.

Mouse glioblastoma tumor with phagocytic macrophages
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers say a drug that acts on noncancerous, tumor-infiltrating cells might provide a new treatment option for the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer.

Pictured: BCG
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, February 1, 2013

Researchers have shed light on how an important treatment for early-stage bladder cancer enters cancer cells to eradicate them.

Pictured: Prasad Adusumilli
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 3, 2013

A team from Memorial Sloan Kettering has found that the makeup of immune cells in a lung tumor and in tissue surrounding a tumor can predict whether the cancer will recur after surgery.

Pictured: Ming Li
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 14, 2012

Recent findings by Memorial Sloan Kettering immunologists might one day pave the way for new strategies to control a range of diseases, including autoimmune disorders and cancer.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: T cells on surface on thymus
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 6, 2012

A recent study holds promise for the development of a new type of drug to alleviate immune deficiency caused by cancer treatment, radiation injury, or certain diseases.

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