Pictured: Macrophage & Tumor Cells
Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 1, 2014

Approaches used for research into the social lives of bacteria can also be used to explore how tumors behave and evolve.

Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, March 3, 2014

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Snapshot
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered how a common bacterium can evolve to become more mobile and easier to get rid of.

Pictured: Clostridium difficile
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Information about the microbiome, the genes of all the microorganisms that naturally inhabit the human body, is leading to new approaches for treating infections in cancer patients.

Pictured: Liang Deng
Profile
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 26, 2013

Physician-scientist Liang Deng cares for patients with melanoma and other skin cancers, and also conducts innovative research on poxviruses.

Pictured: BCG
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, February 1, 2013

Researchers have shed light on how an important treatment for early-stage bladder cancer enters cancer cells to eradicate them.

Pictured: Marcel R. M. van den Brink
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, December 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have shown for the first time that administering a growth factor called interleukin-7 can help patients regenerate T cells more quickly after stem cell transplantation.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Joao Xavier and Eric Pamer
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, July 19, 2012

New studies investigate how the use of antibiotics affects the balance of both harmful and beneficial bacteria in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

Pictured: T cells on surface on thymus
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 6, 2012

A recent study holds promise for the development of a new type of drug to alleviate immune deficiency caused by cancer treatment, radiation injury, or certain diseases.

Pictured: Eric Pamer
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, January 20, 2012

Infections are a common cause of complications in cancer patients. Now a Memorial Sloan Kettering research team finds that a commonly prescribed antibiotic could increase susceptibility to a bacterial infection.

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