Survivorship Center: New & Noteworthy

Pictured: Karen Hartman
Six Tips for Managing Fear of Cancer Recurrence

Social worker Karen Hartman shares coping strategies that cancer survivors can use to lessen fear of recurrence as they adjust to life after treatment.

Pictured: Karen Hartman
Couple at dinner
Dating and Cancer: Deciding When to Get Back Out There and How to Have “the Cancer Talk”

Social worker Barbara Golby gives advice to cancer survivors who are entering or re-entering their search for that special person.

Couple at dinner
Pictured: Lara Benusis
What are the benefits of exercise during and after cancer treatment?

Lara Benusis, head of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Exercise and Yoga Program, discusses what cancer patients should know about exercise during and after treatment.

Pictured: Lara Benusis
Virtual Community Provides Real Support to Patients and Caregivers

Connections gives patients and caregivers an online meeting place where they can exchange advice, get support, and connect with the Memorial Sloan Kettering community.

Pictured: Charles Sklar
Follow-Up Care Crucial for Pediatric Cancer Survivors

In this Q&A, pediatric endocrinologist Charles Sklar discusses Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Long-Term Follow-Up Program, which manages the health of pediatric cancer survivors.

Pictured: Charles Sklar
Helping Cancer Survivors Rebuild Their Lives after Treatment

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Resources for Life After Cancer program was created to support cancer survivors in dealing with psychological, physical, and practical issues related to cancer and its treatment.

Pictured: Bridges Newsletter
Bridges Newsletter for Survivors Celebrates Five Years

Bridges, Memorial Sloan Kettering’s newsletter written by and for cancer survivors, celebrates its fifth year of publication this summer.

Pictured: Bridges Newsletter
Study Finds Adults Treated for Childhood Cancer Are at Significantly Increased Risk for Chronic Health Problems

An analysis of more than 1,700 survivors of childhood cancer reveals that approximately 95 percent are likely to develop one or more health conditions in adulthood.