A Phase II Study of Inhaled Lipid Cisplatin in Pulmonary Recurrent Osteosarcoma

Protocol
12-205
Full Title
Phase 2 Study of Inhaled Lipid Cisplatin in Pulmonary Recurrent Osteosarcoma
Phase
II
Disease Status
Relapsed/Refractory
Purpose

Cisplatin is a drug commonly used to treat osteosarcoma (bone cancer). This study is assessing the safety and effectiveness of a form of the drug in which the cisplatin is combined with lipids (fatty substances) and inhaled by the patient using a nebulizer.

The investigators in this study are evaluating inhaled lipid-encapsulated cisplatin in adolescents and adults with recurrent osteosarcoma that had spread to the lungs and was surgically removed. It is hoped that this method of administering cisplatin will be more effective than conventional intravenous therapy for reaching any osteosarcoma cells remaining in the lungs after surgery.

Eligibility

To be eligible for this study, patients must meet several criteria, including but not limited to the following:

  • Patients must have osteosarcoma that spread to the lungs only.
  • Patients may have had up to two pulmonary recurrences and must have had the tumors removed surgically from the lungs.
  • Patients may have had up to two prior regimens of chemotherapy.
  • Patients must have recovered from the serious side effects of prior treatments. At least 2 weeks must have passed since completion of prior chemotherapy and no more than 4 weeks since prior lung surgery and entry into the study.
  • This study is open to patients ages 13 and older.

For more information and to inquire about eligibility for this study, please contact Dr. Alexander Chou at 212-639-6057.

Disease(s)
Primary Bone: Osteosarcoma
Sarcomas: Osteosarcoma
Locations
Related Diseases

Cancer Clinical Trials: Personalizing for Each Patient

Join our experts for a discussion of clinical trials on November 18. Clinical trials can give patients access to new drugs and other treatments before they are widely available, but how do you know if a trial is right for you?

Learn more »