A Phase I Study of Ganetespib with Paclitaxel and Trastuzumab in Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

Protocol
13-168
Full Title
A Phase I Clinical trial of Ganetespib (Heat shock protein 90 inhibitor) in Combination with Paclitaxel and Trastuzumab in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 Positive (HER2+) Metastatic Breast Cancer
Phase
I
Purpose

Paclitaxel and trastuzumab are anticancer drugs used to treat breast cancer. Trastuzumab is used to treat women whose breast cancers are fueled by the HER2 protein. Despite these drugs, however, the breast cancer may continue to grow in some women.

In this study, researchers want to determine the highest dose of the investigational drug ganetespib which can be given in combination with paclitaxel and trastuzumab in women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer that is not responding to standard therapy. Ganetespib works by blocking heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which may be more active in cancer cells and which partners with other proteins to send messages telling cancer cells to grow.

All three drugs used in this study are given intravenously.

Eligibility

To be eligible for this study, patients must meet several criteria, including but not limited to the following:

  • Patients must have HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer that is not responding to standard therapies.
  • At least 3 weeks must have passed since completion of prior therapies and entry into the study.
  • Patients must be able to be ambulatory for more than half of their normal waking hours.
  • This study is open to patients age 18 and older.

For more information and to inquire about eligibility for this study, please contact Dr. Shanu Modi at 646-888-5243.

Disease(s)
Breast Cancer
Locations
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