A Phase I Study of SNX-5422 in Patients with Advanced Lung Cancer

Protocol
13-230
Full Title
A Phase 1, Open-label, Dose-escalation Study of SNX-5422 plus Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Subjects with Selected Solid Tumors
Phase
I
Purpose

Carboplatin and paclitaxel are standard chemotherapy drugs used to treat advanced lung cancer. However, the cancer often continues to grow despite this therapy. The purpose of this study is to find the best dose of an investigational drug called SNX-5422 that can be given with carboplatin and paclitaxel in patients with advanced lung cancer. It is hoped that giving these drugs in combination will be more effective than if they were given alone.

SNX-5422 works against cancer by blocking a protein that cancer cells need called HSP90. SNX-5422 has been assessed alone in patients, but this is the first study to combine SNX-5422 with carboplatin/paclitaxel in patients. SNX-5422 is taken orally (by mouth), while carboplatin and paclitaxel are given intravenously (by vein).

Eligibility

To be eligible for this study, patients must meet several criteria, including but not limited to the following:

  • Patients must have non-small cell lung cancer that does not contain EGFR, ALK, or KRAS mutations, or they must have small cell lung cancer.
  • Patients may have had up to one prior regimen of therapy for metastatic cancer.
  • Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are permitted if at least one week passes between completion of therapy and entry into the study.
  • At least 2 weeks must have passed since completion of any radiation therapy and 4 weeks since completion of prior chemotherapy (with the exception of tyrosine kinase inhibitors) and entry into the study.
  • This study is open to patients age 18 and older.

For more information and to inquire about eligibility for this study, please contact Dr. Alexander Drilon at 646-888-4206.

Disease(s)
Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell
Lung Cancer, Small Cell
Locations

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