A Phase I Study of PRT062070 in Patients with Persistent or Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Cell Lymphocytic Leukemia, or B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Protocol
14-023
Full Title
A Phase I Open-Label, Multi-Dose, Dose Escalation Study of PRT062070 in Patients with Relapsed/Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma SLL) or B-Cell Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)
Phase
I
Purpose

The purpose of this study is to find the highest dose of an investigational drug called PRT062070 that can be given safely in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), small cell lymphocytic leukemia (SLL), or B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). There are standard therapies for these cancers, but sometimes the cancer stops responding to them or comes back after treatment is finished. Doctors are therefore seeking more effective therapies for these diseases.

PRT062070 is designed to inhibit cancer growth by blocking the activity of two proteins that cancer cells need to grow: spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) and janus kinase (Jak). It is taken orally (by mouth).

Eligibility

To be eligible for this study, patients must meet several criteria, including but not limited to the following:

  • Patients must have CLL, SLL, or B-cell NHL that has persisted or returned despite prior therapy.
  • Patients must have recovered from the serious side effects of previous treatment.
  • Patients must be physically well enough that they are fully ambulatory, capable of all self care, and are capable of all but physically strenuous activities. As an example, patients must be well enough that they would be able to carry out office work or light housework.
  • This study is for patients age 18 and older.

For more information about this study and to inquire about eligibility, please contact Dr. Paul A. Hamlin at 212-639-6143.

Disease(s)
Leukemia: Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Lymphoma: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
Locations

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