Cognition in Older Breast Cancer Survivors: Influence of Treatment, Genetics, and Smoking History

Protocol
14-071
Full Title
Cognition in Older Breast Cancer Survivors: Treatment Exposure, APOE and Smoking History
Purpose

People who have been treated for breast cancer sometimes report that their minds “do not seem to be clear.” This could be due to the cancer itself, its treatment, or interactions among other factors. Sometimes these changes in thinking are short-lived, while other times they are longer lasting.

In this study, researchers are studying older women who were treated for breast cancer (either with or without chemotherapy) and comparing them with older women who never had cancer. Investigators will also examine the influence of smoking history and APOE (the gene for apolipoprotein E, which has been linked with cognitive decline). Participants will be asked to complete questionnaires and neuropsychological testing assessing thinking and memory ability, and to provide a blood sample to be tested for APOE.

Eligibility

This study includes women age 65 and older who were treated for breast cancer five to 15 years before entering the study (age 60 or older at the time of their diagnosis). The study will also include older women who never had cancer. All participants must be able to understand English so they can complete the assessments.

For more information about this study, please contact Dr. Tim Ahles at 646-888-0048.

Disease(s)
Breast Cancer
Survivorship
Locations
Related Diseases