Donating Blood & Platelets: After You've Donated Blood

What Screening Is Done on Your Blood?

After you have donated, your blood will be tested for syphilis, HIV (the virus that causes AIDS), hepatitis, and HTLV (Human T-Lymphotropic Virus), which can cause a blood or nerve disease. Your blood may also be used in studies to evaluate new research methods or investigational tests to improve the safety of the blood supply.

What Happens If We Find a Problem with Your Blood?

If you test positive for any of the diseases named above, you will be notified and your blood will not be used for transfusions. In addition, you may be asked to speak with one of our medical professionals at the Blood Bank and scheduled for a follow-up visit and further testing. Your consent for re-testing will be requested again at that time.

The names of donors with positive test results are kept in confidential files and will not be released without your written consent unless required by law. We will not notify you if your test results are negative (we do not find any problems) or if the blood samples we collected were insufficient to provide enough blood to complete laboratory tests.

If You Have Concerns After You Have Donated

If after giving blood, you become aware of or remember any information about your health that could affect whether or not we should transfuse your blood, please call the Blood Donor Room at 212-639-7648.

Please Note

As of June 1, 2000, Public Health Law (PHL 2131) requires that a confirmed positive HIV test be confidentially reported to the New York State Department of Health.