Pressroom: Press Releases

2012

Genetic Profiling Can Help Doctors More Accurately Predict Prognosis and Guide Treatment Decisions for Leukemia Patients

Researchers have identified a set of genetic abnormalities in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) that doctors can use to more accurately predict patients’ prognoses and select treatments that are most likely to benefit them. The study, led by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, will be published in the March 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

March 14, 2012
Rare Medical Phenomenon Of Systemic Tumor Disappearance Following Local Radiation Treatment Reported In A Patient With Metastatic Melanoma

A rarely seen phenomenon in cancer patients — in which focused radiation to the site of one tumor is associated with the disappearance of metastatic tumors all over the body — has been reported in a patient with melanoma treated with the immunotherapeutic agent ipilimumab (Yervoy™).

March 7, 2012
Colonoscopy Prevents Deaths From Colon Cancer

For the first time, a new study has shown that removing polyps by colonoscopy not only prevents colorectal cancer from developing, but also prevents deaths from the disease. Patients in the study were evaluated for up to 23 years after having the procedure, providing the longest follow-up results to date.

February 22, 2012
Cycle for Survival Event Advances Research and Treatments for Rare Cancers

More than 10,000 people nationwide will participate in Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center’s sixth annual Cycle for Survival event taking place this February at Equinox clubs in New York City, Long Island, Washington D.C., Chicago, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.

February 1, 2012
Targeted Therapy Improves Overall Survival in Men with Late-Stage Prostate Cancer

The investigational oral drug MDV3100 significantly improved overall survival in patients with advanced prostate cancer, results of a large, phase III study show.

January 31, 2012

2011

Memorial Sloan Kettering Receives $50 Million in Honor of Josie Robertson

As a tribute to Memorial Sloan Kettering Board member Josephine “Josie” Robertson, Memorial Sloan Kettering has joined with The Robertson Foundation to undertake two high-profile initiatives — the Josie Robertson Surgery Center and the Josie Robertson Investigators Program — made possible by a $50 million commitment from The Robertson Foundation.

December 21, 2011
Experimental Treatment Could Improve Stem Cell Transplants

A Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center study suggests that a new, experimental treatment could make bone marrow and stem cell transplantation more effective and safe.

December 10, 2011
Researchers Discover Why New Melanoma Drug Stops Working

Research led by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering has identified a previously unknown mechanism of resistance to the newly approved melanoma drug, vemurafenib.

November 23, 2011
City of Hope and Memorial Sloan Kettering Receive NCI Grant to Train Nurses Caring for Cancer Survivors

A five-year grant of more than $1.4 million will fund a program to train nurses in helping survivors achieve the best possible quality of life after cancer.

October 17, 2011
Three Young Investigators Named Winners of Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center will recognize three young investigators for their exceptional bodies of innovative work that has helped to advance the field of cancer research. The researchers will receive the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research, an award presented biennially by Memorial Sloan Kettering to honor promising scientists under the age of 46.

September 20, 2011
Gene Mutation Contributes To Leukemia By Enhancing Function Of Blood Stem Cells

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers helped to identify a key insight into what first goes wrong in the development of many leukemias.

June 30, 2011
First Comprehensive Analysis Of Gene Mutations In Ovarian Cancer Brings Patients One Step Closer To Personalized Medicine

According to a large-scale genomic analysis of the most common and aggressive type of ovarian cancer, researchers from Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center and other centers within The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project identified genetic mutations and pathways that distinctly set the disease apart not only from other types of ovarian cancer, but from other solid tumors as well.

June 29, 2011
Breast Cancer Treatment Shows Benefit For Women With Small, Localized Disease

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center physician-scientists report that women with small, node-negative, HER2-positive breast cancer may obtain a significant benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy with trastuzumab (Herceptin®), a drug previously shown to improve outcomes in advanced cancer and prevent the return of cancer in women diagnosed with higher-risk, early-stage, HER2-positive breast cancer. This study appears online in the journal Cancer, and will be published in a future print edition.

June 24, 2011
Groundbreaking Advances In The Treatment Of Advanced Melanoma Led By Physician-Researchers At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

In an extraordinary demonstration of excellence, positive results from two separate studies of new therapies for the treatment of advanced melanoma were presented at the plenary session of the 2011 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology by Paul Chapman, MD, and Jedd Wolchok MD, PhD, members of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center’s Melanoma and Sarcoma service, and lead authors on the studies along with collaborators from more than a one hundred cancer centers worldwide.

June 5, 2011
New Drug Combination Slows Tumor Growth For Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

Bevacizumab (Avastin®) in combination with chemotherapy resulted in a clinical benefit for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer, according to a new study. Results from the phase III “OCEANS” trial were presented today by the lead author, Carol Aghajanian, MD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, at the 2011 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

June 4, 2011
Tumors In Majority Of Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer Found To Have Genetic Mutations That Can Be Treated With Targeted Therapies

A new study detected one of ten such mutations in 54 percent of the 516 lung cancer patients tested at diagnosis. The results enabled doctors to select the most appropriate drug designed to block the identified mutation and choose other treatment options for those patients whose tumors did not have a mutation.

June 4, 2011
Drug Shown To Significantly Improve Survival In Men With Metastatic Prostate Cancer While Exploring A Potential Biomarker To Measure Treatment Response

The final survival analysis of an international study of a new drug for prostate cancer has found an even greater median survival benefit than previously reported, and has established a new class of treatment for men with metastatic prostate cancer. In addition, researchers are exploring a potential biomarker of response to treatment in general.

June 4, 2011
Drug Shown to Improve Overall Survival in Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

An international, multi-center study has found that a recently FDA-approved drug called abiraterone acetate significantly improves overall survival in men with metastatic prostate cancer by more than 34 percent. Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden Hospital in the UK as well as other cancer centers around the world published the findings in the May 26, 2011, issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.

May 25, 2011
Blood Test Given Earlier Than Recommended Predicts Long-Term Risk of Death from Prostate Cancer and Suggests Annual PSA Testing for Most Men is Unnecessary

A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test taken for the first time between the ages of 44 and 50 can predict the likelihood that a man will die from prostate cancer over the next 25 to 30 years, according to researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

May 19, 2011
Novel Immunotherapy Drug Receives FDA Approval for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma

The US Food and Drug Administration announced today that the drug ipilimumab (brand name Yervoy) has been approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. It is the first drug ever shown to improve overall survival for patients with advanced melanoma.

March 25, 2011
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