About Our Research: Recent Discoveries & Advances

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers are relentlessly exploring every aspect of cancer — from basic investigations of cells and molecules to clinical trials of new treatments and population-wide studies of the disease. While our core mission is to translate this knowledge into new strategies to control cancer, many of our investigators are also making scientific progress against other diseases and conditions.

Below are some examples of discoveries and advances that recently were made in our laboratories and clinics, and featured in our blog, On Cancer.

2014

Pictured: Robotic surgery
Study Shows Robotic Surgery Holds No Major Advantages for Bladder Cancer Patients
July 24, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that the use of surgical robots does not lead to better outcomes in patients undergoing radical cystectomy for bladder cancer, bringing into question the added costs of the tools.

Memorial Sloan Kettering Celebrates 130 Years of Progress
July 16, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering celebrates 130 years of tremendous progress in our quest to eradicate cancer.

Pictured: Gum ball machines
What Is Tumor Heterogeneity?
July 2, 2014

Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.

Scott W. Lowe
Pictured: Michael Berger
New Tumor Sequencing Test Will Bring Personalized Treatment Options to More Patients
June 12, 2014

A powerful diagnostic test, MSK-IMPACT™ gives our doctors an unparalleled amount of information about individual people’s cancers to guide their treatment.

Pictured: Activated macrophage
How Cancers Co-opt Our Immune Defenses
June 5, 2014

Researchers are exploring a mysterious population of immune cells that live within tumors and can help the cancer grow and spread.

Ming Li; Ruth Franklin
Pictured: Macrophage & Tumor Cells
Turning to Bacteria for Cancer Clues
May 1, 2014

Approaches used for research into the social lives of bacteria can also be used to explore how tumors behave and evolve.

Joao Xavier; Johanna Joyce
Pictured: José Baselga
Memorial Sloan Kettering Featured Prominently at Major Cancer Research Meeting
April 10, 2014

Discoveries made at Memorial Sloan Kettering receive recognition at the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Pictured: Human cell nucleus
Not So Fast: Dividing Cells Use a “Speed Limit” to Avoid Genetic Mistakes
April 8, 2014

The discovery of a molecular process that slows down cell division could provide new understanding about how some cancers develop.

Pictured: Douglas Levine
Aggressive Ovarian Cancer May Be Caused by a Single Gene Mutation
April 1, 2014

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that appears to cause a rare but very aggressive type of ovarian cancer in young women.

Pictured: Jan Grimm
Spongelike Particles Show Promise for Delivering Drugs to Tumors
March 10, 2014

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers are investigating the use of tiny particles that behave like sponges to take in drugs and deliver them to tumors.

Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq
Bacteria May Hold the Key to Preventing Dangerous Side Effect of Transplants
March 3, 2014

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

 Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel
Holding On and Hiding Out: How Cancer Cells Spread to the Brain and Thrive
February 27, 2014

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Pictured: Renier Brentjens, Isabelle Rivière & Michel Sadelain
New Trial Advances Cell-Based Immune Therapy for Certain Leukemias
February 20, 2014

A new study evaluating a cell-based immune therapy to treat an aggressive type of leukemia — the largest study of its kind to date — reports that 88 percent of patients responded to the treatment.

Pictured: Stephen Solomon
Poking Holes in Cancer — One Electric Current at a Time
January 27, 2014

Irreversible electroporation – a new, minimally invasive treatment that uses electric current to poke tiny holes in cell membranes – is showing promise against hard-to-treat tumors.

Stephen B. Solomon
Obesity Linked to Poor Prognosis in Tongue Cancer
January 22, 2014

Obesity in patients with early-stage tongue cancer has been linked to a five-fold increase in the risk of death.

Pictured: Alice Ho
Blanket Coverage: New Radiation Technique Improves Breast Cancer Treatment
January 20, 2014

A new approach for treating breast cancer spreads radiation doses over a larger number of beams, providing more thorough coverage.

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung & Jeremy D
Scaling the Mountains behind the Mountains in Neuroblastoma Research
January 9, 2014

Common genetic alterations in neuroblastoma tumors may help doctors predict the likelihood the cancer will spread to the brain.

Nai-Kong V. Cheung

2013

Pictured: Stem cell-derived nerve cells exposed to progerin
Researchers Fast-Forward Stem Cell Aging to Study Degenerative Diseases
December 30, 2013

A team of Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists has come up with an approach to make stem-cell-derived neurons rapidly age in a cell culture dish. The breakthrough could transform research into Parkinson’s and other late-onset diseases.

Pictured: Low-dose CT scans
Memorial Sloan Kettering Research Featured in Report on Top Cancer Advances of 2013
December 26, 2013

The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual report on top clinical cancer advances of the year once again features several studies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers.

Clifford A. Hudis
Pictured: Charles L. Sawyers, William Polkinghorn & Simon Powell
Molecular Studies Explain Effectiveness of Longtime Treatment for Prostate Cancer
December 12, 2013

Laboratory studies have revealed an explanation for why androgen-deprivation therapy makes radiation therapy more effective in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer.

Pictured: Ross Levine
New Diagnostic Test for Blood Cancers Will Help Doctors Tailor Treatments
December 9, 2013

A new diagnostic test co-developed by Memorial Sloan Kettering identifies hundreds of genetic alterations in blood cancers, which will guide physicians in treatment decisions.

Pictured: Casper zebrafish
Transparent Fish Reveal Secrets of Tumor Spread
December 3, 2013

Physician and cell biologist Richard White has generated a transparent and stripeless strain of zebrafish to study how tumors develop the capacity to metastasize to new organs.

Richard Mark White
Pictured: Oliver Zivanovic, Garrett Nash & Dennis Chi
Heated Chemotherapy: Using Robust Science to Guide Clinical Decisions
November 15, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering experts are leading investigations of a procedure called hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, also known as HIPEC.

Study Reveals Genetic Causes for Thyroid Cancer Increase after Chernobyl
November 13, 2013

The study of some victims exposed to ionizing radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident is yielding new information about how radiation-induced thyroid cancer develops.

James A. Fagin
Pictured: Sarat Chandarlapaty
Researchers Identify Mutations that Cause Some Breast Cancers to Resist Treatment
November 8, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found genetic mutations that cause some breast cancers to develop resistance to hormone therapy.

Pictured: Laurie Glimcher, Craig Thompson, Marc Tessier-Lavigne & Tadataka Yamada
Innovative Partnership Will Speed Drug Discovery and Development
October 24, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering is joining with two other academic institutions in a pioneering collaboration to speed early-stage drug discoveries into therapies for patients.

David A. Scheinberg
Mouse glioblastoma tumor with phagocytic macrophages
Immune Cells in the Brain Could be Enlisted to Fight Glioblastoma
October 15, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers say a drug that acts on noncancerous, tumor-infiltrating cells might provide a new treatment option for the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer.

Breast cancer mosaic
New Technology Could Enable Immediate Detection of Tumor Borders during Surgery
October 9, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists are developing new imaging instrumentation that could enable pathologist and surgeons to collaborate more seamlessly and reduce the need for repeat surgeries.

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa
The Social Behavior of Bacteria Offers New Ideas for Antimicrobial Drug Design
October 1, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered how a common bacterium can evolve to become more mobile and easier to get rid of.

Pictured: Daniel Thorek & Jan Grimm
Faster than the Speed of Light: New Imaging Approach Could Measure Tumor Activity
September 25, 2013

A new imaging approach being investigated by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers could provide better information about a tumor’s molecular activity, allowing for a more accurate diagnosis.

Jan Grimm; Daniel Thorek
Pictured: Derek Tan
Taking Clues from Nature for the Development of New Drugs
September 16, 2013

In this Q&A, Memorial Sloan Kettering chemist Derek Tan discusses why natural products offer inspiration for the development of new drugs.

Derek Tan
Pictured: Lawrence Dauer
Data on New Procedure to Remove Small Breast Cancers Shows Benefits to Patient Experience
September 10, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering clinicians report on a successful first year of using a new procedure to pinpoint and remove small breast cancers.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit
Gene Mutation Linked to Inherited Risk of Common Form of Childhood Leukemia
September 9, 2013

Researchers have found the first evidence that susceptibility to developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia during childhood may be heritable.

Pictured: Cancer cell lines
Do Cancer Cell Lines Really Resemble Tumors? Now Researchers Can Tell
August 26, 2013

A recent study found that the cell lines most commonly used for research on ovarian cancer are not the most suitable.

Pictured: Robert J. Motzer
Comparison of Drugs for Advanced Kidney Cancer Suggests Side Effects Are More Manageable with Newer Option
August 22, 2013

An international study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering found that pazopanib (Votrient®) controls cancer as effectively as sunitinib (Sutent®) while improving patients’ quality of life.

Robert J. Motzer
Pictured: Micropapillary Morphology
Pattern in Lung Cancer Pathology May Predict Cancer Recurrence after Surgery
August 9, 2013

A Memorial Sloan Kettering study shows that an abnormal cell pattern found in the tumor tissue of some lung cancer patients may help to predict which tumors are more likely to recur after surgery.

Pictured: Clostridium difficile
Microbiome Studies May Benefit Cancer Patients
August 7, 2013

Information about the microbiome, the genes of all the microorganisms that naturally inhabit the human body, is leading to new approaches for treating infections in cancer patients.

Study Shows Acupuncture May Relieve Chronic Lymphedema after Breast Cancer Treatment
June 19, 2013

A Memorial Sloan Kettering study suggests that lymphedema of the arm, a swelling that can occur following breast cancer treatment, may be reduced by acupuncture.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok & Richard Carvajal
Memorial Sloan Kettering Researchers Report on Major Advances in the Treatment of Metastatic Eye and Skin Melanoma
June 3, 2013

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering studies that hold promise for the treatment of advanced uveal (eye) melanoma and advanced skin melanoma are making headlines at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Pictured: Three-dimensional structure of the protein mTOR
A Recently Revealed Protein Structure Creates New Opportunities for Cancer Research and Drug Design
May 30, 2013

In an eagerly awaited study, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers report on the molecular structure of mTOR, a protein commonly mutated in cancer.

Nikola P. Pavletich
Pictured:  Timothy Chan
Investigators Sequence the Genome of a Rare Head and Neck Cancer
May 24, 2013

Investigators have sequenced the genome of adenoid cystic carcinoma, a rare and deadly head and neck cancer. The work sets the stage for the sequencing of additional rare cancers at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

Pictured: Paul Russo
Many Affected by Kidney Cancer Are Not Informed about Kidney-Sparing Surgery Option
May 20, 2013

A study has found that the majority of kidney cancer patients with small tumors have their entire kidney removed, which can increase the risk of developing chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular complications.

Paul Russo
Pictured: Melanocytes
Pigment-Producing Skin Cells Generated Using Stem Cell Technology
May 14, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have developed innovative ways to study some skin diseases, including melanoma skin cancer.

Pictured: Douglas Levine
Large Genetic Study Could Improve Endometrial Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment
May 1, 2013

An analysis of endometrial cancers reveals genetic information that should improve diagnosis and guide treatments for women with an aggressive form of the disease.

Douglas A. Levine
Pictured: Charles Sawyers
Research Suggests a New Approach for Overcoming Resistance to a Targeted Therapy for Prostate Cancer
April 30, 2013

Research suggests that a new drug could be effective in patients with prostate cancer who develop resistance to the targeted therapy enzalutamide.

Pictured: Gary Schwartz & Mark Dickson
Studies Show Promise for Treatment Advances in Several Types of Sarcoma
April 22, 2013

Two clinical trials of targeted therapies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators show promising results against different types of sarcoma.

Mark A. Dickson
Pictured: Andrew Vickers
A Single Early PSA Test Found to Predict Long-Term Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer
April 17, 2013

A study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators indicates nearly half of all prostate cancer deaths by age 75 occur in a small group of men with high PSA levels at age 45.

Andrew Vickers
Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
Combining Two FDA-Approved Drugs May Be Harmful for Patients with Metastatic Melanoma
April 4, 2013

Early research led by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering cautions against combining ipilimumab and vemurafenib for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit
New Findings May Lead to Better Predictions of Breast Cancer Risk in Women with Inherited Mutations
March 28, 2013

A study identifies genetic variations that alter the risk of breast cancer in women who have a certain gene mutation.

Kenneth Offit
Pictured: Isabelle Rivière, Michel Sadelain & Renier Brentjens
Cell-Based Immune Therapy Shows Promise in Leukemia Patients
March 20, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have used genetically modified immune cells to eradicate cancer in five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Pictured: ESK1 Monoclonal Antibody
New Molecule Targets Proteins Inside Cancer Cells
March 13, 2013

Scientists from Memorial Sloan Kettering have collaborated on the discovery of a unique monoclonal antibody, called ESK1, that appears to be effective at targeting and destroying several types of cancer cells.

David A. Scheinberg
Pictured: James Fagin
Drug Reverses Radioiodine Resistance in Some People with Advanced Thyroid Cancer
February 14, 2013

Researchers have found that the investigational drug selumetinib shuts down the signaling of genetic mutations that prevent some patients’ thyroid cancer tumors from absorbing radioiodine, the most effective treatment for the disease.

James A. Fagin
Pictured: Neurons
Researchers Identify Key Element of Nerve Cell Development
February 11, 2013

Researchers have clarified the process by which developing nerve cells are directed to specialize into distinct parts.

Songhai Shi; She Chen
Pictured: BCG
Study Clarifies How Bladder Cancer Treatment Works
February 1, 2013

Researchers have shed light on how an important treatment for early-stage bladder cancer enters cancer cells to eradicate them.

Pictured: Kenneth Yu
Blood Test Could Predict Which Patients with Pancreatic Cancer May Benefit from Chemotherapy
January 29, 2013

New research suggests that analyzing genetic changes found in the bloodstream may help doctors predict which chemotherapy regimens will work for some patients.

Kenneth H. Yu
Pictured: Mark Bilsky
Physicians Pioneer Less Invasive Approach for Treating Spine Tumors
January 25, 2013

Our doctors have shown that tumors compressing the spinal cord can be controlled using less-invasive surgery combined with a precise, intense form of radiation therapy.

Pictured: Prasad Adusumilli
Study Reveals Immune Response as Potential Biomarker to Predict Recurrence of Lung Cancer
January 3, 2013

A team from Memorial Sloan Kettering has found that the makeup of immune cells in a lung tumor and in tissue surrounding a tumor can predict whether the cancer will recur after surgery.

2012

Pictured: Marcel R. M. van den Brink
New Treatment May Help Transplant Patients Recover Immune Function More Quickly
December 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have shown for the first time that administering a growth factor called interleukin-7 can help patients regenerate T cells more quickly after stem cell transplantation.

Pictured: X-ray Image
New Findings Clarify How Kidney Cancer Spreads to Distant Organs
December 19, 2012

Scientists have identified genes and biological mechanisms that one day could be targeted with drugs to stop kidney cancer from spreading to the bone, brain, or other organs.

Pictured: Michel Sadelain
New Technique Could Make Cell-Based Immune Therapies for Cancer Safer and More Effective
December 18, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have reported a new method that could allow the development of more-specific, cell-based therapies for cancer.

Michel Sadelain
Pictured: Ming Li
Study Suggests New Ways of Manipulating Immune System to Treat Autoimmune Diseases and Cancer
December 14, 2012

Recent findings by Memorial Sloan Kettering immunologists might one day pave the way for new strategies to control a range of diseases, including autoimmune disorders and cancer.

Ming Li
Pictured: Paul Chapman
New England Journal of Medicine Case Study Reveals New Information about Advanced Melanoma Treatment
December 7, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering experts add to their knowledge of vemurafenib, a drug recently approved by the FDA to treat some patients with metastatic melanoma.

Paul B. Chapman
Pictured: Michael Zelefsky
Medication Used Before, During, and After Radiation Treatment Helps Men with Prostate Cancer Maintain Overall Sexual Function
November 30, 2012

Study signals hope for maintaining sexual function in men undergoing radiation treatment for prostate cancer.

Pictured: PET Scan
New Imaging Agent Could Improve Prostate Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment
November 15, 2012

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering are developing a new strategy for PET imaging of tumors that could result in new tools to detect and monitor prostate cancer.

Pictured: Marc Ladanyi & Snjezana Dogan
Study Suggests Women Are More Susceptible to Smoking-Related Lung Cancers
November 9, 2012

A genetic analysis of tumors suggests women are more susceptible than men to the most common form of lung cancer.

Pictured: Martin Weiser
More-Accurate Colorectal Cancer Staging Helps Doctors Personalize Treatment
November 8, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s colorectal cancer team has developed online prediction tools that assess disease risk following surgery, enabling patients and physicians to make better treatment decisions.

Martin R. Weiser
Pictured: Structure of Synthesized Erythropoietin
Memorial Sloan Kettering Investigators Synthesize Vital Biological Molecule Erythropoietin for the First Time
October 8, 2012

Researchers have produced a fully synthetic, functional version of erythropoietin, the hormone that controls production of red blood cells.

Pictured: Tunneling Nanotubes
Tunneling Nanotubes Connect Cancer Cells
September 19, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered a way that cancer cells may be able to exchange information by establishing long bridges between cells called tunneling nanotubes.

Malcolm A. S. Moore
Genome Sequencing of One Patient’s Tumor Could Lead to New Treatment Options for Some Bladder Cancer Patients
September 17, 2012

When new cancer drugs are shown to be largely ineffective, exceptional cases of good outcome may pave the way for new treatments that could benefit a smaller group of patients.

David B. Solit
Pictured:
Two Memorial Sloan Kettering Studies Focus on Role of Antibiotics in Stem Cell Transplantation
September 13, 2012

Researchers examined how changes in the microbiota may make patients more susceptible to severe infections and other complications.

Clinical Trials Analysis Finds Acupuncture Effective for Treating Chronic Pain
September 11, 2012

In the most rigorous analysis of its kind to date, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers find acupuncture to be an effective therapy for several types of pain.

Andrew Vickers
Pictured: Ross Levine
Researchers Discover Why Some Leukemia Drugs Are Not Sufficiently Effective
September 6, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found why certain drugs are not sufficiently effective in treating leukemias called myeloproliferative neoplasms.

Ross L. Levine
Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
Study Suggests Refined Donor Selection Could Improve Outcomes of Bone Marrow Transplantation in Leukemia
September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Katharine C. Hsu
Pictured: Filippo Giancotti
Researchers Shed Light on Why Some Breast Cancers Spread to the Lungs
August 24, 2012

A new Memorial Sloan Kettering study has identified one of the proteins fueling the spread of some breast cancers, and researchers hope their findings will lead to the development of new diagnostic tools and drugs.

Filippo Giancotti
Pictured: Kenneth Offit & Zsofia Stadler
Researchers Find Early-Onset Testicular Cancer May Occur from Spontaneous Genetic Mutations
August 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators have found that some testicular cancers arising early in life may result from genetic changes that have not been inherited from either parent.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière and Michel Sadelain
Launch of Stem Cell Therapy Trial Offers Hope for Patients with Inherited Blood Disorder
July 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s trial to evaluate a new therapy for patients with beta-thalassemia is the first to receive FDA approval to treat this disease with genetically engineered cells.

Pictured: Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum
Surgeons Develop Method to Reduce Lymph Node Removal in Gynecologic Cancers
July 9, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering surgeons have pioneered a technique that may improve quality of life for women with early-stage gynecologic cancers.

Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum
Pictured: Joan Massagué
Study Links Cancer’s Ability to Spread with Chemotherapy Resistance
July 6, 2012

A team of investigators from Memorial Sloan Kettering has shown for the first time that tumor growth, metastasis, and chemotherapy resistance are connected to the same molecular changes inside breast cancer cells.

Pictured: Helena Furberg
Researchers Identify Genetic Link to Smoking Addiction among People of African American Descent
June 27, 2012

In the largest study of genes and smoking performed in a minority population to date, researchers have discovered a gene variant that increases a person’s risk of smoking.

Helena Furberg
Pictured: Douglas Levine and Petar Jelinic
New Web Tool Helps Researchers Explore How the Genome Changes in Cancer
June 21, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators hope their new web tool will improve the accessibility of large-scale genome-sequencing information for cancer researchers everywhere, and accelerate research and therapeutic discovery.

Chris Sander
Pictured: Chaya Moskowitz
Breast Cancer Risk Higher Than Previously Thought for Some Female Childhood Cancer Survivors
June 4, 2012

A new study confirms that female childhood cancer survivors who were treated with radiation to the chest have a high risk of developing breast cancer at a young age – a risk that is comparable to that of women who have mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.

Chaya Moskowitz
Pictured: Robert Motzer
New Drug Shows Promise for Patients with Advanced Kidney Cancer
May 21, 2012

Results of an international study indicate that the investigational drug tivozanib is more effective and better tolerated than a currently approved therapy in delaying cancer growth.

Robert J. Motzer
Pictured: Paul Paik
Testing for Mutations Identified in Squamous Cell Lung Cancer Tumors Helps Personalize Treatment
May 17, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering was one of the first centers to use this type of genetic testing for lung cancer patients and is currently one of the only centers testing for mutations in squamous cell carcinomas of the lung.

Paul K. Paik
Pictured: At Eternity’s Gate by Vincent van Gogh
New Form of Psychotherapy Might Ease Emotional Suffering of Terminally Ill Cancer Patients
April 30, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found that people in the late stages of cancer might benefit from meaning-centered psychotherapy, a treatment aimed at helping people sustain a sense of meaning and purpose.

William S. Breitbart
Pictured: Moritz Kircher
New Technique for Imaging Brain Tumors Could Allow More Accurate Surgical Removal
April 25, 2012

Researchers have demonstrated a technique that enables specific and accurate labeling of brain tumor tissue in mice. If proven effective in patients, the method could make complete surgical removal of brain tumors more feasible.

Moritz F. Kircher
Pictured: T cells on surface on thymus
Study Points the Way for Future Therapy to Revive a Damaged Immune System
April 6, 2012

A recent study holds promise for the development of a new type of drug to alleviate immune deficiency caused by cancer treatment, radiation injury, or certain diseases.

Pictured: Elizabeth Morris
Patient Experience Improves with New Collaborative Approach to Pinpoint and Remove Small Breast Cancers
March 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering is the first and only hospital in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut to offer a new, more patient-friendly approach for doctors to precisely pinpoint and remove small breast cancers.

Pictured: Ross Levine
Genetic Profiling Could Help Doctors Make More-Accurate Leukemia Prognoses
March 15, 2012

Researchers have identified a set of genetic abnormalities that can enhance prognostic accuracy and aid treatment selection for people with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung
Researchers Find Gene Mutations Linked to Age at Neuroblastoma Diagnosis
March 13, 2012

In a large-scale genome-sequencing study, researchers have discovered mutations in neuroblastoma tumors that could aid the development of diagnostic tests and therapies.

Nai-Kong V. Cheung
Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
Rare Medical Phenomenon: Melanoma Patient’s Tumors Disappear throughout the Body after Radiation of One Tumor
March 8, 2012

Findings from a multidisciplinary research team led by Memorial Sloan Kettering medical oncologist and immunologist Jedd Wolchok could help shed light on the immune system’s role in fighting cancer.

Jedd D. Wolchok
Pictured: Ann Zauber
Study Finds Colonoscopy Prevents Deaths from Colon Cancer
February 23, 2012

For the first time, a new study has shown that removing polyps by colonoscopy not only prevents colorectal cancer from developing, but also prevents deaths from the disease.

Pictured: Timothy Chan
Studies Show How Certain Gene Mutations May Promote Cancer
February 15, 2012

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering studies provide new clues about genetic mutations that affect cell behavior and play a role in several types of cancer.

Pictured: Ion Channel K2P1
3D Shape of an Ion Channel Revealed
February 9, 2012

Structural biologist Stephen Long talks about how his team used x-ray crystallography to discover the structure of an ion channel called K2P1.

Stephen B. Long
Pictured: Marc Ladanyi & Laetitia Borsu
Genetic Study Identifies Mutations in Pediatric Cancers
February 1, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have performed the first large-scale genetic analysis of several pediatric cancers, identifying mutations and potential targets for therapies to treat the cancers.

Study Finds Most Children Don't Use Sunscreen Regularly
January 23, 2012

Research has shown that children who have experienced a sunburn at an early age are at almost double the risk for developing melanoma in adulthood. Now, a new study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering epidemiologist Stephen Dusza finds that most children do not regularly use sunscreen.

Pictured: Eric Pamer
Researchers Shed Light on Possible Cause of Infections in Cancer Patients
January 20, 2012

Infections are a common cause of complications in cancer patients. Now a Memorial Sloan Kettering research team finds that a commonly prescribed antibiotic could increase susceptibility to a bacterial infection.

Pictured: Michael Morris
Bone Scan Index May Help Determine Response to Prostate Cancer Treatment
January 13, 2012

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering have shown the usefulness of a scale called the Bone Scan Index (BSI) for determining whether some prostate cancer patients are responding to therapy.