On Cancer: Cell Signaling & Regulation

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23 Blog posts found

In the Lab

Neutrophil Recruitment — What's Damage Got to Do with It?

Immune cells called neutrophils are the first responders to sites of infection. A new study probes what gets them there.

Wounding a zebrafish tail fin triggers a wave of calcium that signals damage and recruits neutrophils

Roundup

Highlights from MSK at the 2018 American Association for Cancer Research Meeting

Read up on the latest developments in several key areas of cancer research, including genomic mapping, disease modeling through CRISPR, CAR T therapy, and cancer stem cells.

Sign for AACR scientific meeting featuring collage of images

In the Clinic

Experimental Cancer Drug Developed at MSK Leads to New Approach for Treating Alzheimer's Disease

A family of drugs developed at MSK targets disrupted processes in cells in diseases related to aging.

Chemical biologist Gabriela Chiosis in a laboratory

Feature

How a Chicken Helped Solve the Mystery of Cancer

When this feathered patient found her way into a New York laboratory in 1909, she changed the course of cancer science.

A barred Plymouth Rock hen

Science Byte

PSMA: A New Target for Prostate Cancer Treatment

Researchers have discovered how a high level of the protein PSMA in cells helps fuel prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer cells, colored red in scanning electron micrograph (SEM).

In the Lab

New Study Shows How Wayward Chromosomes Get Back on Track

MSK researchers are learning how cells are able to recognize and correct errors that occur during cell division.

A cell in the process of dividing

In the Lab

Studying Cancer Mysteries Just Beneath the Scales

Hail to the zebrafish. MSK scientists are using a small fish to answer some big questions about cancer.

Pictured: Casper zebrafish

Q&A

Picturing the Body’s Immune Response

Cell biologist Philipp Niethammer discusses what the zebrafish can teach us about how the body heals.

In the Lab

Manipulating a Single Gene Turns Colorectal Cancer Cells Back to Normal

For the first time, scientists have shown that the gene APC, which is mutated in the vast majority of colorectal cancers, might be a promising target for future therapies.

Organoid cell structures fluorescing in blue, green, and purple.

In the Lab

From Blob to Fly: How Cells Work Together to Shape the Body and Its Organs

Learn about the spectacular research taking place in the laboratory of developmental biologist Jennifer Zallen, who was recently elected a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator.