On Cancer: Immunotherapy

and/or

80 Blog posts found

Finding

Adding Low-Dose Radiation Could Make CAR T Therapy More Effective, Study Finds

The treatment combination appears to boost chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells’ ability to kill cancer cells in solid tumors.

Blue cancer cell with a target on it

In the Clinic

New Study Shows Immunotherapy and Chemo Combination Extends Survival for People with Hard-to-Treat Breast Cancer

MSK experts comment on a new international study that looked at combination therapy for triple-negative breast cancer.

Elizabeth Comen with a patient

In the News

Former MSK Immunologist James Allison Wins Nobel Prize in Medicine

Dr. Allison is being honored for discovering how to take the brakes off cancer-fighting immune cells.

James Allison

In the Lab

Putting the STING in Immunotherapy: Research Focuses on Ways to Improve Cancer Treatments

Researchers are looking for ways to make cancer cells more visible to the immune system.

Different viewpoints of the STING pathway

In the Clinic

Taking on Mantle Cell Lymphoma: MSK Leads Research into New Treatments

Learn about novel therapies emerging for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma.

MSK medical oncologist Anita Kumar

In the Clinic

How Acute Myeloid Leukemia Is Treated at MSK: An Interview with Martin Tallman

Learn about the latest advances in treatment for AML and how people can benefit from receiving their treatment at MSK.

Leukemia Service Chief Martin Tallman

Feature

Meet the Scientists Who Engineer CAR T Cells, a Type of "Living" Immunotherapy

An immunotherapy called CAR T is transforming the treatment of certain cancers. These are the people who make it possible.

MSK cell manufacturing specialist Xiuyan Wang

Q & A

Meet Matthew Matasar, Chief of the Medical Oncology Service at MSK Bergen

Get to know Matthew Matasar, the new Chief of the Medical Oncology Service at MSK Bergen.

MSK medical oncologist Matthew Matasar

Finding

Discovery of Unusual Cell Type Could Help Guide Immunotherapy

A newly identified group of immunosuppressive cells could provide insight into the effects of immunotherapy drugs.

Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of T lymphocyte cells (blue) attached to a red cancer cell.