On Cancer: Metastasis & Drug Resistance

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35 Blog posts found

In the Lab

Shape-Shifting Stem Cells Are Key to Cancer Metastasis and Immune Evasion

By assuming primitive regenerative identities, cancer cells gain the adaptability they need to establish tumors in new parts of the body.

An illustration of lung develop alongside tumor evolution

In the Lab

What Does Cancer Metastasis Have to Do with Wound Healing? More than You Might Think

Scientists are learning that — in a literal sense — metastasis is wound healing gone wrong.

Graphical representation of cells leaking into bloodstream

In the Lab

Mind the Gap: Scientists Learn How Cells Make and Repair Tight Connections

New findings from researchers at the Sloan Kettering Institute provide insight into a fundamental biological process called the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

Epithelial cells

Finding

Large Study Pinpoints Genetic Changes Underlying Drug Resistance in the Most Common Type of Breast Cancer

Scientists are learning how estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer evolves to thwart hormonal therapies and are developing ways to stop it.

Colored dots (cells) separating through a funnel-like structure.

In the Lab

Studying a Forerunner of Pancreatic Cancer Reveals New Clues about How the Disease Develops

This research is important for developing better drugs and screening methods for pancreatic tumors.

Pancreatic tumor cells

In the Lab

Scientists Identify Growth Signal for Metastatic Cancer "Seeds"

Targeting this signal with drugs might be one way to stop cancers from spreading.

This image shows cancer cells (white) and pericytes (green) clinging to capillaries (red). The blue dots are nuclei.

Q&A

Reality Check: Study Examines Metastasis after Breast Cancer Surgery

Breast cancer expert Larry Norton says laboratory study in mice shouldn’t affect how people with breast cancer are treated.

Microscopic view of a breast cancer cell

In the Lab

Escape Artists: Cancer Cells Mimic Immune Cell Activity to Spread

Researchers have discovered that cancer cells may hijack an immune response to spread from a primary tumor to distant organs.

Illustration of cells with blue nuclei that have green DNA bits floating in the cytoplasm

In the Lab

When Cancer Spreads: Research Focuses on Better Ways to Treat Metastasis

MSK investigators are learning how cancer cells escape from the original tumor and hide out in the body. Their goal is to prevent metastatic tumors from forming.

Sloan Kettering Institute Director Joan Massagué with laboratory member Karuna Ganesh

Q&A

What Evolution Can Tell Us about How Cancer Spreads

Meet Christine Iacobuzio-Donahue, a physician-scientist who studies cancer metastasis and is collaborating on genetics research with scientists at the American Museum of Natural History.

MSK pathologist Christine Iacobuzio-Donahue