On Cancer: Structural Biology

and/or

10 Blog posts found

In the Lab

Deciphering How Membrane Enzymes Work, with a Little Help from Beetles

The atomic structure of an elusive type of membrane protein has finally been solved by scientists at the Sloan Kettering Institute.

A gray blob marked RAS linked to colorful rods marked ICMT

In the Lab

Scientists Unlock Structure of mTOR, a Key Cancer Cell Signaling Protein

Structural biologists in the Sloan Kettering Institute have used a powerful tool called cryo-EM to solve the structure of a major cancer player.

cryo-EM picture of mTORC1

Science Byte

Lifeguard on Duty: Looking at DNA Repair under a Microscope

Learn about what DNA repair looks like under a microscope.

Blue cells containing small red dots on a green and black background

Announcement

MSK Symposium Honors Dinshaw Patel, Titan of Structural Biology

Scientists came to MSK to celebrate the 75th birthday of a leader in the field of structural biology.

Feature

Understanding the DNA-Damage “First Responders”: John Petrini at Work

Scientists know that cancer can result from mistakes in DNA repair. But understanding what controls the repair process itself has been a hard nut to crack.

Molecular biologist John Petrini of the Sloan Kettering Institute.

In the Lab

New Drug Developed at MSK Starves Acute Myeloid Leukemia of a Signaling Fix

An innovative collaboration between basic scientists and clinical researchers has led to a promising new drug for AML.

Light micrograph of white blood cells from a patient with acute myeloid leukemia.

In the Lab

A Recently Revealed Protein Structure Creates New Opportunities for Cancer Research and Drug Design

In an eagerly awaited study, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers report on the molecular structure of mTOR, a protein commonly mutated in cancer.

Pictured: Three-dimensional structure of the protein mTOR

Honor

Structural Biologist Christopher Lima Named Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator

Dr. Lima is one of 27 biomedical researchers in the country being named an HHMI investigator today. This elite group of scientists will receive approximately $150 million over the next five years.

Pictured: Christopher Lima

Honor

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering Investigators Named to National Academy of Sciences

Structural Biology Program Chair Nikola P. Pavletich and immunologist Alexander Y. Rudensky have received one of the highest honors given to scientists working in the United States.

Pictured: Nikola Pavletich and Alexander Rudensky

Q&A

3D Shape of an Ion Channel Revealed

Structural biologist Stephen Long talks about how his team used x-ray crystallography to discover the structure of an ion channel called K2P1.

Pictured: Ion Channel K2P1