On Cancer

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16 Blog posts found

In the Clinic

Wiping Out Epstein-Barr Virus Preserves Transplant Success

Memorial Sloan Kettering physician-scientists have treated a dangerous complication of stem cell transplantation using immune cells donated from a third party.

Pictured: Susan Prockop & Lucas T.

In the Lab

Bacteria May Hold the Key to Preventing Dangerous Side Effect of Transplants

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq

Snapshot

The Social Behavior of Bacteria Offers New Ideas for Antimicrobial Drug Design

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered how a common bacterium can evolve to become more mobile and easier to get rid of.

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa

In the Lab

Microbiome Studies May Benefit Cancer Patients

Information about the microbiome, the genes of all the microorganisms that naturally inhabit the human body, is leading to new approaches for treating infections in cancer patients.

Pictured: Clostridium difficile

In the Lab

Study Suggests Refined Donor Selection Could Improve Outcomes of Bone Marrow Transplantation in Leukemia

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell

In the Lab

Researchers Shed Light on Possible Cause of Infections in Cancer Patients

Infections are a common cause of complications in cancer patients. Now a Memorial Sloan Kettering research team finds that a commonly prescribed antibiotic could increase susceptibility to a bacterial infection.

Pictured: Eric Pamer