Pictured: Alexander Rudensky
Announcement
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Dr. Rudensky studies the development of white blood cells called T lymphocytes, which participate in the immune system response to infection. He joined the Sloan Kettering Institute in 2009.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, September 4, 2012

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Nikola Pavletich and Alexander Rudensky
Honor
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Wednesday, May 30, 2012

Structural Biology Program Chair Nikola P. Pavletich and immunologist Alexander Y. Rudensky have received one of the highest honors given to scientists working in the United States.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok and James Allison
In the News
By Media Staff  |  Friday, April 20, 2012

In an article describing the history and promise of immunotherapy for cancer treatment, the magazine highlights the groundbreaking work of James Allison, Chair of the Sloan Kettering Institute’s Immunology Program, and medical oncologist and immunologist Jedd Wolchok.

Pictured: T cells on surface on thymus
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 6, 2012

A recent study holds promise for the development of a new type of drug to alleviate immune deficiency caused by cancer treatment, radiation injury, or certain diseases.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, March 8, 2012

Findings from a multidisciplinary research team led by Memorial Sloan Kettering medical oncologist and immunologist Jedd Wolchok could help shed light on the immune system’s role in fighting cancer.

Pictured: Eric Pamer
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, January 20, 2012

Infections are a common cause of complications in cancer patients. Now a Memorial Sloan Kettering research team finds that a commonly prescribed antibiotic could increase susceptibility to a bacterial infection.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, December 12, 2011

A Memorial Sloan Kettering study suggests that a new, experimental treatment could make bone marrow and stem cell transplantation safer and more effective.

Pictured: Lloyd J. Old
In Memoriam
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Sunday, December 4, 2011

Memorial Sloan Kettering notes with sadness the death of Lloyd J. Old, who was internationally recognized as one of the founders and standard bearers of the field of tumor immunology.

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