Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Learn about five hot science areas that are changing the way we understand and treat cancer.

Fibrous extensions of a nerve cell (red) and an oligodendrocyte (green) growing on top of the nerve cell
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 5, 2015

In a recent study, Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists used stem-cell engineering to repair brain injuries in rats. The results raise hope for future therapies that could prevent or fix nerve damage in cancer patients who need brain radiation.

In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, January 28, 2015

An annual report from an influential cancer group highlights three MSK studies that have advanced cancer research.

Neurons created from embryonic stem cells
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 22, 2015

A new tool called optogenetics is revealing clues about the function of a promising experimental therapy derived from stem cells.

Pictured: Experimental Brain Tumor
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, September 18, 2014

Researchers have engineered a gene into therapeutic cells that allows them to turn off tumor growth if some of the cells become cancerous.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
MSK at ASCO
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Our experts offer their perspective in major media outlets on recent research into drug- and cell-based immunotherapies for cancer.

Pictured: Renier Brentjens, Isabelle Rivière & Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 20, 2014

A new study evaluating a cell-based immune therapy to treat an aggressive type of leukemia — the largest study of its kind to date — reports that 88 percent of patients responded to the treatment.

Pictured: Stem cell-derived nerve cells exposed to progerin
In the Lab
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Monday, December 30, 2013

A team of Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists has come up with an approach to make stem-cell-derived neurons rapidly age in a cell culture dish. The breakthrough could transform research into Parkinson’s and other late-onset diseases.

Pictured: Michel Sadelain
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have reported a new method that could allow the development of more-specific, cell-based therapies for cancer.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière and Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s trial to evaluate a new therapy for patients with beta-thalassemia is the first to receive FDA approval to treat this disease with genetically engineered cells.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière, Michel Sadelain & Renier Brentjens
Feature
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Years of innovative research, technology development, and facility expansion at Memorial Sloan Kettering have led to several new experimental treatments for people with cancer.

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