Jonas M. Sokolof, DO

About Me

I am a physician specializing in physical medicine and rehabilitation (also known as PM&R, or physiatry). After completing my residency training at Harvard Medical School, I went on to subspecialize in musculoskeletal medicine and interventional spine care (epidural injections, sacroiliac joint injections, facet joint injections, and others) at UMDNJ/Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation. While I was at Kessler, I acquired additional skills in the non-operative treatment of various musculoskeletal conditions, such as arthritis, low back pain, neck pain, coccygodynia, neuropathy, dystonia, and tendinitis.

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As a physiatrist, my goal is to help restore my patients’ function through the use of various non-operative treatments including, but not limited to, rehabilitation prescription, injections (for spine and joint pain), medication prescription, and manual medicine treatments. Whenever possible, I try to avoid prescribing medications for long-term use and prefer a more holistic approach to patient care. As such, I have expertise in osteopathic manipulative medicine treatment (OMT), also known as manual medicine. OMT is “hands-on care” — using the hands to diagnose, treat, and prevent illness or injury. Various techniques are used including stretching, gentle pressure, and resistance. I often find this modality useful as an adjunct to my therapeutic repertoire. If clinically indicated, I am also able to use my skills in image-guided injections for the spine and peripheral joints. Additionally, I perform electrodiagnostic testing (EMG) to diagnose and guide treatment of various neuromuscular disorders.

The focus of my current practice is on the rehabilitation needs of cancer patients and survivors. My goal is to help patients improve their overall function and quality of life. As the need for physical rehabilitation grows in the field of cancer medicine, I find it exciting and rewarding to be part of the team here at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

My research interests involve the use of regenerative agents — such as autologous growth factors — derived from platelets and stem cells taken from the patient’s own body to help heal various structures in the musculoskelatal system. I believe that the future of musculoskeleltal medicine will focus on the ability of patients to heal themselves from substances that the body produces naturally as opposed to many medications that seem merely to relieve symptoms. I look forward to contributing to this area through further study.

  • Clinical Expertise: Non-surgical treatment of musculoskeletal problems, interventional spine procedures (epidural, sacroiliac, and facet joint injections, peripheral joint injections) NCS/EMG, osteopathic manipulation.
  • Languages Spoken: English
  • Education: DO, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Residencies: Harvard Medical School
  • Fellowships: University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey/Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation
  • Board Certifications: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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Publications

Atkinson K, Sokolof J : Rheumatoid Arthritis, In: Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: 2nd Ed (Frontera W, Silver J). Elsevier, 2008. 833-837.

Sokolof J Knight R: Deep Vein Thrombosis, In: Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: 2nd Ed (Frontera W, Silver J). Elsevier, 657-663

Slovik DM, Sokolof J: Osteoporosis, In: Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: 2nd Ed (Frontera W, Silver J). Elsevier, 2008. 753-759.

Sokolof J. Central Hypersensitivity in Chronic Pain. In: The Painless Messenger: A Practitioner’s Resource for Chronic Pain Management. 2006.

Goldberg RT, Sokolof JM, Lipson ML: Physiotherapy and rehabilitation in the new millennium, In: The Practice of Minimally Invasive Spinal Technique: 2005 Ed (Savitz MH, Rauschning W, Chiu JC, et al.,eds), AAMISS Press, New York, NY, 2005, pp 194-207.

Esses D, Gallagher EJ, Iannaccone R, Bijur P, Srinivas VS, Rose H, Kunkel L, Sokolof J. Six-hour versus 12-hour protocols for AMI: CK-MB in conjunction with myoglobin. Am J Emerg Med. May 2001;19(3):182-186.

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Clinical Trials

As home to one of the world’s top cancer research centers, Memorial Sloan Kettering is typically involved in more than 900 clinical trials at a given time. Currently, clinical trials focused on the conditions I treat are enrolling new patients. If you’re interested in joining a clinical trial, click to learn about the trial’s purpose, eligibility criteria, and how to get more information.

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