Medication Instructions Before Your Intrathecal RIT Injections

Share
This resource cannot be sent to your patient.
You can view and print as a PDF in Standard Font or Large Font.
Time to Read: About 1 minute

This information explains when to start taking certain medications before each of your intrathecal radioimmunotherapy (RIT) antibody injections. Your nurse practitioner (NP) will fill in the information with you. Call them if you have questions.

Back to top

Potassium Iodide (SSKI®) and Liothyronine (Cytomel®)

Potassium iodide and liothyronine are medications to help protect your thyroid during your treatment. If you’re getting an antibody injection radiolabeled with iodine, you’ll need to take potassium iodide and liothyronine before and after each injection. Your healthcare provider will give you a prescription.

Start taking potassium iodide and liothyronine 7 days before each antibody injection. Keep taking them every day until 2 weeks after each antibody injection. Your oncologist or NP will tell you what dose (amount) to take and when to start and stop taking them.

Your oncologist or NP will give you a medication diary. Use it to record the potassium iodide and liothyronine you take. Write your initials in each box when you take your medication. Be sure to write any missed doses in your diary. Bring your diary to all your appointments.

‌  Take the potassium iodide (SSKI) and liothyronine (Cytomel) until the end date your oncologist or NP gave you. Read your medication diary for more information.

 

Back to top

Dexamethasone (Decadron®) and an Antacid

Dexamethasone is a steroid medication that helps control inflammation (swelling).

Start taking dexamethasone the night before each antibody injection. You’ll take a total of 6 doses of dexamethasone for each injection:

  • 1 dose the night before each injection.
  • 2 doses in clinic on the day of each injection. A nurse will give you these doses.
  • 2 doses the day after each injection.
  • 1 dose the second day after each injection.

Your oncologist or NP will tell you exactly what dose to take and when to start and stop taking it.

Antacid Schedule

Sometimes, dexamethasone can upset your stomach. Taking an antacid on the days you take the dexamethasone can help prevent this. For most people, your healthcare provider will give you a prescription for a liquid antacid. On the day of your antibody injections, a nurse will give you the antacid in clinic.

Your oncologist or NP will tell you exactly what dose to take and when to start and stop taking it.

For more information about your intrathecal RIT, read the resource About Your Intrathecal Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for Pediatric Patients.

Back to top

Tell us what you think

Tell us what you think

Your feedback will help us improve the educational information we provide. Your care team cannot see anything you write on this feedback form. Please do not use it to ask about your care. If you have questions about your care, contact your healthcare provider.

While we read all feedback, we cannot answer any questions. Please do not write your name or any personal information on this feedback form.

Questions Yes Somewhat No

Last Updated