Midazolam

Pediatric Medication

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This information from Lexicomp® explains what you need to know about this medication, including what it’s used for, how to take it, its side effects, and when to call your healthcare provider.

Brand Names: US

Nayzilam

Warning

  • This drug may cause very bad and sometimes deadly breathing problems. Call the doctor right away if your child has slow, shallow, or trouble breathing.
  • This drug is a benzodiazepine. The use of a benzodiazepine drug along with opioid drugs has led to very bad side effects. Side effects that have happened include slowed or trouble breathing and death. Opioid drugs include drugs like codeine, oxycodone, and morphine. Opioid drugs are used to treat pain and some are used to treat cough. Talk with the doctor.
  • If your child is taking this drug with an opioid drug, get medical help right away if your child feels very sleepy or dizzy; if your child has slow, shallow, or trouble breathing; or if your child passes out. Get medical help right away if your child does not respond, does not answer or react like normal, or will not wake up.

What is this drug used for?

  • It is used to calm a child before a procedure.
  • It is used to cause sleep during a procedure.
  • It is used to treat seizures.

What do I need to tell the doctor BEFORE my child takes this drug?

  • If your child has an allergy to this drug or any part of this drug.
  • If your child is allergic to any drugs like this one or any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell the doctor about the allergy and what signs your child had, like rash; hives; itching; shortness of breath; wheezing; cough; swelling of face, lips, tongue, or throat; or any other signs.
  • If your child has glaucoma.
  • If your child takes any other drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins). There are many drugs that interact with this drug, like certain drugs that are used for HIV, infections, or seizures.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this drug.

Tell the doctor and pharmacist about all of your child’s drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for your child to take this drug with all of his/her drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug your child takes without checking with the doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while my child takes this drug?

All products:

  • Tell all of your child’s health care providers that your child is taking this drug. This includes your child’s doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • This drug may be habit-forming with long-term use.
  • This drug has a risk of abuse and misuse. Give this drug only as you were told by the doctor. Tell the doctor if your child has ever abused or been addicted to any drugs or alcohol.
  • This drug is not meant for regular, daily use. Talk with the doctor.
  • Have your child avoid tasks that call for alertness until the effects of this drug wear off and your child feels fully awake. These include things like riding a bike, playing sports, or using items such as scissors, lawnmowers, electric scooters, toy cars, or motorized vehicles. Your child may also need to wait for 1 full day after getting this drug.
  • Have your child use care when moving around after getting this drug. Your child may need help with standing and walking until the effects of this drug have worn off.
  • Alcohol may interact with this drug. Be sure your child does not drink alcohol.
  • Talk with your child’s doctor before giving your child other drugs and natural products that may slow your child’s actions.
  • Avoid giving your child grapefruit and grapefruit juice.
  • Use with care in children. Talk with the doctor.

If your child is pregnant or breast-feeding a baby:

  • This drug may cause harm to the unborn baby if your child takes it during pregnancy. If your child is pregnant or gets pregnant while taking this drug, call the doctor right away.
  • Tell the doctor if your child is breast-feeding a baby. You will need to talk about any risks to the baby.

Liquid (syrup) and injection:

  • Studies in young animals and children have shown that frequent or long-term use of anesthesia drugs or drugs used for sleep in children younger than 3 years of age may lead to long-term brain problems. This may also happen in unborn babies if the mother uses this drug during the third trimester of pregnancy. Talk with the doctor.

Injection:

  • Some products have benzyl alcohol. Do not give a product that has benzyl alcohol in it to a newborn or infant. Talk with the doctor to see if this product has benzyl alcohol in it.

What are some side effects that I need to call my child’s doctor about right away?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your child’s doctor or get medical help right away if your child has any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Chest pain or pressure.
  • Shakiness.
  • Twitching.
  • Very bad dizziness or passing out.
  • Feeling agitated.
  • Trouble controlling body movements.
  • If seizures are new or worse after starting this drug.
  • Like other drugs that may be used for seizures, this drug may rarely raise the risk of suicidal thoughts or actions. The risk may be higher in people who have had suicidal thoughts or actions in the past. Call the doctor right away about any new or worse signs like depression; feeling nervous, restless, or grouchy; panic attacks; or other changes in mood or behavior. Call the doctor right away if any suicidal thoughts or actions occur.

What are some other side effects of this drug?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your child’s doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother your child or do not go away:

All products:

  • Feeling sleepy.
  • Nose or throat irritation.
  • Headache.
  • Memory problems or loss.

Liquid (syrup) and injection:

  • Feeling sleepy.
  • Feeling tired or weak.
  • Memory problems or loss.

Liquid (syrup):

  • Upset stomach or throwing up.

Injection:

  • Irritation where this drug is given.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your child’s doctor. Call your child’s doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to your national health agency.

How is this drug best given?

Give this drug as ordered by your child’s doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

Nose spray:

  • If you will be using this drug at home, your doctor or nurse will teach you how to use it.
  • Do not give this drug by mouth. Use in your child’s nose only. Keep out of your child’s mouth and eyes (may burn).
  • Do not test or prime before using.
  • If the seizure cluster has not stopped 10 minutes after using this drug, a second dose may be used if your child’s doctor has told you to. Do not use more than 2 doses for the same seizure.
  • If using more than 1 dose, switch nostrils with each dose.
  • If the seizure does not stop after using this drug, get medical help right away.

Liquid (syrup):

  • It is given by mouth only.

Injection:

  • It is given as a shot into a muscle or as an infusion into a vein over a period of time.
  • This drug must not be given into the spine.

What do I do if my child misses a dose?

Nose spray:

  • This drug is used on an as needed basis. Do not use more often than told by the doctor.

Liquid (syrup) and injection:

  • Call your child’s doctor to find out what to do.

How do I store and/or throw out this drug?

Nose spray:

  • Store at room temperature.
  • Store this drug in the blister pack that it comes in. Do not open until ready to use. Do not use if the nasal spray is damaged.

Liquid (syrup) and injection:

  • If you need to store this drug at home, talk with your child’s doctor, nurse, or pharmacist about how to store it.

All products:

  • Keep all drugs in a safe place. Keep all drugs out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Throw away unused or expired drugs. Do not flush down a toilet or pour down a drain unless you are told to do so. Check with your pharmacist if you have questions about the best way to throw out drugs. There may be drug take-back programs in your area.

General drug facts

  • If your child’s symptoms or health problems do not get better or if they become worse, call your child’s doctor.
  • Do not share your child’s drug with others and do not give anyone else’s drug to your child.
  • Keep a list of all your child’s drugs (prescription, natural products, vitamins, OTC) with you. Give this list to your child’s doctor.
  • Talk with your child’s doctor before giving your child any new drug, including prescription or OTC, natural products, or vitamins.
  • Some drugs may have another patient information leaflet. If you have any questions about this drug, please talk with your child’s doctor, nurse, pharmacist, or other health care provider.
  • If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

Consumer Information Use and Disclaimer

This information should not be used to decide whether or not to take this medicine or any other medicine. Only the healthcare provider has the knowledge and training to decide which medicines are right for a specific patient. This information does not endorse any medicine as safe, effective, or approved for treating any patient or health condition. This is only a brief summary of general information about this medicine. It does NOT include all information about the possible uses, directions, warnings, precautions, interactions, adverse effects, or risks that may apply to this medicine. This information is not specific medical advice and does not replace information you receive from the healthcare provider. You must talk with the healthcare provider for complete information about the risks and benefits of using this medicine.

Last Reviewed Date

2019-07-24

Copyright

© 2019 Wolters Kluwer Clinical Drug Information, Inc. and its affiliates and/or licensors. All rights reserved.

Last Updated