Your Child's Development From 6 to 12 Years

This information describes the skills your child is likely to develop between the ages of 6 and 12 years.

What You Can Do to Help Your Child’s Development

Although your child is undergoing cancer treatment and may not feel energetic, it is still important to encourage movement, communication, and play as part of their daily routine. Here are some things you can do:

  • Let your child be as independent as possible with self-care tasks and school activities.
  • Give your child choices and encourage them to complete a task.
  • Provide structure and a regular schedule.
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Call Your Child’s Doctor If Your Child:

  • Shows only a limited range of emotions.
  • Shows extreme behavior (such as if they are unusually fearful, aggressive, shy, or sad).
  • Is unusually withdrawn and not active.
  • Is easily distracted and has trouble focusing on 1 activity for more than 5 minutes.
  • Doesn’t respond to people.
  • Can’t tell what’s real and what’s make-believe.
  • Doesn’t play a variety of games and activities.
  • Can’t give first and last name.
  • Doesn’t use plurals or past tense properly.
  • Doesn’t talk about daily activities or experiences.
  • Doesn’t draw pictures.
  • Can’t brush teeth, wash and dry hands, or get undressed without help.
  • Loses skills they once had.
  • Doesn’t like to change position.
  • Doesn’t like minor changes in environment (such as noise level or lighting).
  • Doesn’t feel comfortable trying to balance on different types of surfaces.
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