About Prostate Cancer

About Prostate Cancer

The prostate is a walnut-size gland that makes and stores semen, a milky liquid that nourishes sperm. It’s located below the bladder in front of the rectum and surrounds the upper part of the urethra, the tube that empties urine from the bladder. The prostate helps regulate bladder control and sexual functioning.

Not all prostate cancers are alike; the disease can behave very differently from one person to another.

After skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. It tends to develop with age; most men with prostate cancer die with the disease, not from it. Most prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas, a type of cancer that begins in the glandular cells.

While doctors and researchers still don’t understand some of the underlying causes of prostate cancer, we’re making important strides. One recent insight we’ve had is that not all prostate cancers are alike; the disease can behave very differently from one person to another. This is why understanding your risk for the disease and the likelihood that it will spread to other parts of the body — and then reassessing your risk level over time — is so very important to caring for you effectively.

More than 90 percent of prostate cancers are found when they’re still within the prostate gland. While some spread early and require drug treatment, many others are slow growing and unlikely to cause serious problems over the course of your lifetime.