Recent News: Molecular Pathology & Diagnostics

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8 News Items found
In the Clinic
Man and woman in white lab coats looking at test tubes
Single-Cell Analysis Enables Researchers to Understand the Differences within Tumors
Scientists are decoding the genetic changes that drive individual cancer cells. This may help them develop more-effective targeted therapies.
Science Byte
Prostate cancer cells, colored red in scanning electron micrograph (SEM).
PSMA: A New Target for Prostate Cancer Treatment
Researchers have discovered how a high level of the protein PSMA in cells helps fuel prostate cancer.
Announcement
Christina Leslie and John Petrini
Expanding the Impact of Precision Medicine to Fuel Discoveries
MSK’s Functional Genomics Initiative will enable basic scientists to take full advantage of the massive amount of data produced by tumor sequencing.
Finding
MSK investigators Michael Berger and David Solit.
Study Reveals How Some Breast Cancers Become Resistant to Targeted Drugs
A study of one patient’s disease has clarified why tumors stop responding to a class of experimental drugs called PI3K inhibitors.
In the Lab
Pictured: Scott Lowe
Researchers Uncover Potential Target for “Undruggable” Form of Liver Cancer
In taking a new approach to finding treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma, MSK scientists have uncovered a potential drug target for this highly aggressive cancer.
Decoder
Pictured: Gum ball machines
What Is Tumor Heterogeneity?
Understanding tumor heterogeneity may be the next big quest in cancer science, as differences between cells within a tumor can have important consequences for how cancers are diagnosed and treated.
Feature
Pictured: Michael Berger & David Solit
Cancer Genomics: New Technologies Speed Discovery and Expand Opportunities for Personalized Medicine
At Memorial Sloan Kettering, new technologies to study gene changes in cancer cells are accelerating the development and implementation of more-effective treatments.

Researchers Find Genetic Key to Breast Cancer's Ability to Survive and Spread

New research led by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center sheds light on a genetic function that gives breast cancer cells the ability to survive and spread to the bone years after treatment has been administered.

  • Monday, July 6, 2009