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11 News Items found

Finding

Gut Microbes May Protect People Having Bone Marrow Transplants

For the first time, researchers have found an association between the makeup of the microorganisms in the body before a bone marrow transplant and a patient’s survival afterward.

Jonathan Peled speaks during a press conference

Finding

Don't Scratch That Mole? Scientists Are Learning More about Inflammation and Cancer

It's not only what's inside your cells that determines your cancer risk. It's what surrounds them too.

A doctor examines a mole.

In the Lab

Bacteria versus Bacteria: Two Studies Uncover Species of Microbes That Protect against Infections in People with Cancer

Research recently published by MSK scientists suggests that the best way to fight dangerous bacteria may be with other bacteria.

Images from three different mice showing the effects of antibiotics and microbiome replacement

Announcement

News from #AACR16: Targeted Therapy Breakthrough, Improved Survival in Melanoma, and Benefits of Gut Bugs

Long-awaited results of clinical trials testing targeted drugs and immunotherapy combinations were on offer at the annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) conference.

Dr. Joan Massagué, Sloan Kettering Institute Director received the Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research and was named an AACR fellow at AACR16.

In the Lab

Identification of Beneficial Bacteria May Lead to New Treatment for Common Infection

Clostridium difficile infections are a growing problem, but MSK researchers are looking for innovative ways to prevent and treat them.

Pictured: Joao Xavier & Eric Pamer

In the Lab

The Enemy’s Telltale Mark: Researchers Find Novel Way Body Defends against Harmful Bacteria

MSK researchers discover that the body senses and attacks harmful bacteria indirectly after the pathogens cause stress within the cells.

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa

In the Lab

Bacteria May Hold the Key to Preventing Dangerous Side Effect of Transplants

Research suggests that the presence of a type of bacteria called Blautia, which occurs naturally in the body, may prevent graft-versus-host disease, a potentially fatal side effect of bone marrow and stem cell transplants.

Pictured: Marcel van den Brink & Robert Jenq

Snapshot

The Social Behavior of Bacteria Offers New Ideas for Antimicrobial Drug Design

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have discovered how a common bacterium can evolve to become more mobile and easier to get rid of.

Pictured: Pseudomonas aeruginosa

In the Lab

Microbiome Studies May Benefit Cancer Patients

Information about the microbiome, the genes of all the microorganisms that naturally inhabit the human body, is leading to new approaches for treating infections in cancer patients.

Pictured: Clostridium difficile

In the Lab

Study Suggests Refined Donor Selection Could Improve Outcomes of Bone Marrow Transplantation in Leukemia

In the future, more-advanced genetic testing might offer better ways to match up patients who need a bone marrow transplant with potential donors.

Pictured: Natural Killer Cells & Cancer Cell