Perspective
By Paul Sabbatini, MD, Deputy Physician-in-Chief for Clinical Research  |  Friday, July 26, 2013

The clinical trial remains our best tool to identify new therapies, but as with all tools, innovation is required if trials are to remain relevant.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok & Richard Carvajal
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, June 3, 2013

Two Memorial Sloan Kettering studies that hold promise for the treatment of advanced uveal (eye) melanoma and advanced skin melanoma are making headlines at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

Pictured: Robert Motzer & Suzanne Gornell
Video
By Allyson Collins, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Our experts have participated in or led the development of five of the seven drugs approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for patients with advanced kidney cancer since 2005.

Pictured: Gary Schwartz & Mark Dickson
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 22, 2013

Two clinical trials of targeted therapies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering investigators show promising results against different types of sarcoma.

Pictured: José Baselga
Finding
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, April 8, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Physician-in-Chief, José Baselga, explains the findings from three studies on new targeted therapies for breast cancer.

Pictured: Jedd Wolchok
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, April 4, 2013

Early research led by investigators at Memorial Sloan Kettering cautions against combining ipilimumab and vemurafenib for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

Pictured: Paul Sabbatini
Q&A
By Media Staff  |  Tuesday, April 2, 2013

In his new role as Deputy Physician-in-Chief for Clinical Research, Paul Sabbatini aims to streamline, accelerate, and expand Memorial Sloan Kettering’s clinical research program.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière, Michel Sadelain & Renier Brentjens
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have used genetically modified immune cells to eradicate cancer in five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Pictured: Robin Roberts & Tonya Samuel
In the News
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Co-host Robin Roberts gives thanks to her Memorial Sloan Kettering treatment team during her first day returning to the show after receiving a stem cell transplant.

Pictured: James Fagin
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Thursday, February 14, 2013

Researchers have found that the investigational drug selumetinib shuts down the signaling of genetic mutations that prevent some patients’ thyroid cancer tumors from absorbing radioiodine, the most effective treatment for the disease.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers' Laboratory
In the Clinic
By Media Staff  |  Monday, January 7, 2013

The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s notable research advances include the approval of a new drug for men with advanced prostate cancer that was developed and studied by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers.

Pictured: Michael Zelefsky
In the Clinic
By Andrea Peirce, BA and Media Staff
Friday, November 30, 2012

Study signals hope for maintaining sexual function in men undergoing radiation treatment for prostate cancer.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière and Michel Sadelain
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, July 16, 2012

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s trial to evaluate a new therapy for patients with beta-thalassemia is the first to receive FDA approval to treat this disease with genetically engineered cells.

Pictured: Robert Motzer
In the Clinic
By Esther Napolitano, BS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, May 21, 2012

Results of an international study indicate that the investigational drug tivozanib is more effective and better tolerated than a currently approved therapy in delaying cancer growth.

Pictured: Halina Frydman
Patient Story
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Monday, February 13, 2012

Soon after Halina Frydman’s husband noticed changes in his wife's personality, Halina was diagnosed with primary central nervous system lymphoma. She came to Memorial Sloan Kettering to receive treatment through a clinical trial.

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