Pictured: Douglas Levine
Finding
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that appears to cause a rare but very aggressive type of ovarian cancer in young women.

Pictured: Noah Kauff
In the News
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, March 28, 2014

A study has found that mutations in the gene BRCA1 are associated with an increased likelihood of developing a rare, aggressive form of uterine cancer.

 Pictured: Cancer cell on blood vessel
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, February 27, 2014

Researchers have gained new understanding of how tumors metastasize by studying the behavior of exceptional breast and lung cancer cells that are capable of entering the brain and surviving there.

Pictured: Diane Reidy
Feature
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Cycle for Survival, Memorial Sloan Kettering’s nationwide indoor team cycling event, helps support research into rare cancers. Three researchers discuss how these funds benefit their research.

Finding
By Jenifer Goodwin, Freelance Writer  |  Thursday, February 6, 2014

Investigators have found a possible molecular explanation for why obese people with kidney cancer tend to fare better despite having a higher rate of diagnosis.

Pictured: Nai-Kong Cheung & Jeremy D
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, January 9, 2014

Common genetic alterations in neuroblastoma tumors may help doctors predict the likelihood the cancer will spread to the brain.

Pictured: Low-dose CT scans
In the Clinic
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 26, 2013

The American Society of Clinical Oncology’s annual report on top clinical cancer advances of the year once again features several studies led by Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers.

In Memoriam
By Craig Thompson, MD, President and CEO  |  Friday, December 20, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering President and CEO Craig Thompson reflects on the life and career of cancer research pioneer Janet Rowley.

Pictured: Ross Levine
In the Clinic
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, December 9, 2013

A new diagnostic test co-developed by Memorial Sloan Kettering identifies hundreds of genetic alterations in blood cancers, which will guide physicians in treatment decisions.

Pictured: Casper zebrafish
Snapshot
By Jennifer Bell, PhD  |  Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Physician and cell biologist Richard White has generated a transparent and stripeless strain of zebrafish to study how tumors develop the capacity to metastasize to new organs.

Pictured: Joan Massagué
Announcement
By Celia Gittelson, BA  |  Monday, November 25, 2013

Internationally recognized cancer biologist Joan Massagué has been named Director of the Sloan Kettering Institute. He was previously Chair of the Cancer Biology and Genetics Program at Memorial Sloan Kettering.

In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, November 13, 2013

The study of some victims exposed to ionizing radiation from the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident is yielding new information about how radiation-induced thyroid cancer develops.

Pictured: Sarat Chandarlapaty
In the Lab
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Friday, November 8, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers have found genetic mutations that cause some breast cancers to develop resistance to hormone therapy.

Pictured: Mark Robson
Q&A
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Monday, October 21, 2013

As genome sequencing of tumors becomes more routine, it increases the odds that additional disease-related mutations may be discovered by accident, a development that raises profound issues.

Pictured: Kenneth Offit
In the Lab
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Monday, September 9, 2013

Researchers have found the first evidence that susceptibility to developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia during childhood may be heritable.

Center News

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