Pictured: Clifford Hudis
Video
By Memorial Sloan Kettering  |  Friday, November 1, 2013

Medical oncologist Clifford Hudis says advances in immunology and molecular biology are leading to remarkable successes in cancer treatment.

Pictured: Laurie Glimcher, Craig Thompson, Marc Tessier-Lavigne & Tadataka Yamada
Announcement
By Jim Stallard, MA, Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, October 24, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering is joining with two other academic institutions in a pioneering collaboration to speed early-stage drug discoveries into therapies for patients.

Mouse glioblastoma tumor with phagocytic macrophages
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers say a drug that acts on noncancerous, tumor-infiltrating cells might provide a new treatment option for the most common and aggressive type of brain cancer.

Pictured: Derek Tan
Q&A
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Monday, September 16, 2013

In this Q&A, Memorial Sloan Kettering chemist Derek Tan discusses why natural products offer inspiration for the development of new drugs.

Pictured: Robert J. Motzer
In the Clinic
By Maureen Salamon, BA, Freelance Writer  |  Thursday, August 22, 2013

An international study led by Memorial Sloan Kettering found that pazopanib (Votrient®) controls cancer as effectively as sunitinib (Sutent®) while improving patients’ quality of life.

Perspective
By Paul Sabbatini, MD, Deputy Physician-in-Chief for Clinical Research  |  Friday, July 26, 2013

The clinical trial remains our best tool to identify new therapies, but as with all tools, innovation is required if trials are to remain relevant.

Pictured: Three-dimensional structure of the protein mTOR
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, May 30, 2013

In an eagerly awaited study, Memorial Sloan Kettering researchers report on the molecular structure of mTOR, a protein commonly mutated in cancer.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers
In the Lab
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Research suggests that a new drug could be effective in patients with prostate cancer who develop resistance to the targeted therapy enzalutamide.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers
Honor
By Media Staff  |  Wednesday, February 20, 2013

Charles Sawyers, Chair of Memorial Sloan Kettering’s Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, is a recipient of the inaugural $3 million prize for groundbreaking achievements in scientific research.

Pictured: Lorenz Studer
Q&A
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, December 11, 2012

Methods to generate stem cells have given scientists new ways to study some diseases and identify potential drugs, and could one day be used to rebuild diseased or damaged tissues in patients.

Pictured: T cells on surface on thymus
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Friday, April 6, 2012

A recent study holds promise for the development of a new type of drug to alleviate immune deficiency caused by cancer treatment, radiation injury, or certain diseases.

Pictured: Charles Sawyers & Howard Scher
In the News
By Media Staff  |  Friday, February 3, 2012

The success of an experimental prostate cancer treatment is an example of how academic research centers are playing a larger role in drug development, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Pictured: Isabelle Rivière, Michel Sadelain & Renier Brentjens
Feature
By Julie Grisham, MS, Science Writer/Editor  |  Wednesday, December 28, 2011

Years of innovative research, technology development, and facility expansion at Memorial Sloan Kettering have led to several new experimental treatments for people with cancer.

Feature
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Thursday, December 15, 2011

Memorial Sloan Kettering scientists, physicians, and administrators are developing and commercializing research discoveries to generate more-effective and affordable cancer treatments.

Pictured: Structural formula of IBNtxA
In the Lab
By Eva Kiesler, PhD, Science Writer/Editor  |  Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Scientists have generated a compound that could potentially be used to create a new type of pain medication that may prevent the side effects of currently available painkillers.

Center News

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